What do women want and why don't they get it? Mental health treatment for childbearing women: Attitudes, preferences, and barriers

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162123
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
What do women want and why don't they get it? Mental health treatment for childbearing women: Attitudes, preferences, and barriers
Author(s):
Goodman, Janice H.; Tyer-Viola, Lynda
Author Details:
Janice Goodman, PhD, RN, PMHCNS-BC, Associate Professor, MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston, MA, USA, email: jgoodman@mghihp.edu; Lynda Tyer-Viola, RNC, PhD
Abstract:
Purpose: The potential negative consequences of untreated perinatal depression warrant efforts to improve treatment access. This study describes pregnant women's preferences and attitudes regarding treatment for depression, and perceived potential barriers to accessing treatment. Theoretical Framework: Theory of Reasoned Action Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): As part of a larger ongoing longitudinal study, data was collected via questionnaire from a convenience sample of 218 women during the last trimester of pregnancy. Participants were queried as to treatment modalities they would most likely participate in if they wanted help for depression, their attitudes towards psychotherapeutic and pharmacological treatments, and perceived potential barriers to receiving help. Demographic data was obtained, outcome frequencies tabulated, and chi-square analyses conducted to determine if outcomes differed according to depressive group status. Results: Of 218 pregnant women screened, 20.6% experienced significant levels of depressive symptoms (EPDS > 10) and 11% fell into the probable depression range (EPDS > 12). Individual counseling, medication, and family/couples counseling were the most frequently preferred treatments. The greatest perceived potential barriers to accessing depression treatment were lack of time (55%), stigma (42.8%), not knowing where to find services (25.2%), and lack of childcare (23.4%). Most women indicated that individual therapy was definitely or probably acceptable (89.5%), with fewer (56.9%) endorsing the acceptability of group therapy. The acceptability antidepressant medication when not pregnant was 69.8%, compared to 34.4% when pregnant, and 37.2% when breastfeeding. There were no differences in outcomes between depressed versus non-depressed women, except for a significant difference (p = .011) between depression group and acceptability of group therapy, with more depressed women indicating group therapy as definitely or probably unacceptable. Conclusions and Implications: Knowledge about attitudes, preferences and potential barriers to depression treatment for childbearing women in essential in developing acceptable, accessible interventions. This information can be used to develop nursing interventions that will meet the mental health needs of childbearing women.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWhat do women want and why don't they get it? Mental health treatment for childbearing women: Attitudes, preferences, and barriersen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGoodman, Janice H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTyer-Viola, Lyndaen_US
dc.author.detailsJanice Goodman, PhD, RN, PMHCNS-BC, Associate Professor, MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston, MA, USA, email: jgoodman@mghihp.edu; Lynda Tyer-Viola, RNC, PhDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162123-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The potential negative consequences of untreated perinatal depression warrant efforts to improve treatment access. This study describes pregnant women's preferences and attitudes regarding treatment for depression, and perceived potential barriers to accessing treatment. Theoretical Framework: Theory of Reasoned Action Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): As part of a larger ongoing longitudinal study, data was collected via questionnaire from a convenience sample of 218 women during the last trimester of pregnancy. Participants were queried as to treatment modalities they would most likely participate in if they wanted help for depression, their attitudes towards psychotherapeutic and pharmacological treatments, and perceived potential barriers to receiving help. Demographic data was obtained, outcome frequencies tabulated, and chi-square analyses conducted to determine if outcomes differed according to depressive group status. Results: Of 218 pregnant women screened, 20.6% experienced significant levels of depressive symptoms (EPDS > 10) and 11% fell into the probable depression range (EPDS > 12). Individual counseling, medication, and family/couples counseling were the most frequently preferred treatments. The greatest perceived potential barriers to accessing depression treatment were lack of time (55%), stigma (42.8%), not knowing where to find services (25.2%), and lack of childcare (23.4%). Most women indicated that individual therapy was definitely or probably acceptable (89.5%), with fewer (56.9%) endorsing the acceptability of group therapy. The acceptability antidepressant medication when not pregnant was 69.8%, compared to 34.4% when pregnant, and 37.2% when breastfeeding. There were no differences in outcomes between depressed versus non-depressed women, except for a significant difference (p = .011) between depression group and acceptability of group therapy, with more depressed women indicating group therapy as definitely or probably unacceptable. Conclusions and Implications: Knowledge about attitudes, preferences and potential barriers to depression treatment for childbearing women in essential in developing acceptable, accessible interventions. This information can be used to develop nursing interventions that will meet the mental health needs of childbearing women.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:01:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:01:17Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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