Gene Variants and Behavioral Determinants of Stress as Predictors of Health Outcome in Preterm Infants

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162125
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Gene Variants and Behavioral Determinants of Stress as Predictors of Health Outcome in Preterm Infants
Author(s):
Haidet, Kim Kopenhaver
Author Details:
Kim Kopenhaver Haidet, PhD, RNC, CRNP, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA, email: kkh1@psu.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: To examine linkages between biological and behavioral determinants of stress vulnerability in preterm infants. Theoretical Framework: Als' Synactive Theory will be used 1) to examine relationships between biological and behavioral responses to the tactile stimulation associated with nurse care giving, 2) to explore whether variations in the mu opioid receptor (MOR) gene are associated with early postnatal trajectories of stress responses, and 3) to determine if established postnatal trajectories of stress response are associated with neonatal health outcomes at one month of age. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): 60 preterm infants, without known congenital or neurological abnormality, will be enrolled in this prospective, observational study. MOR gene polymorphisms will be identified by genotyping. Morning salivary cortisols will be sampled at baseline and post-phases of standard morning nursing care on day 4-5 of life. Additionally, simultaneous real-time measurements of heart and respiratory rates, oxygen saturations and activity, state, and behavioral stress signals will be digitally recorded and quantified using the NIDCAP naturalistic observation. Resting heart rate variability will be measured at one week and one-month postnatally. Trained coders will rate behavioral-interactional data using a behavioral assessment and facial coding scale. Results: Repeated measures ANOVA will be performed to evaluate changes in stress response between rest and stress periods among gene variant groups. Hierarchical regression will be used to determine the relative contributions of cortisol, autonomic reactivity and behavioral responses on each of the health outcomes. Conclusions and Implications: This phase of research will provide important foundational information on the interaction of biological and behavioral factors associated with stress reactivity and will direct the next phase of research on testing of complementary supportive developmental approaches to preterm infant care. The translation of this knowledge to nursing practice should promote care giving interactions that support the infant's adaptive capabilities to environmental stimuli, thereby, reducing metabolic expenditures, fostering growth and development and recovery from illness.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGene Variants and Behavioral Determinants of Stress as Predictors of Health Outcome in Preterm Infantsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHaidet, Kim Kopenhaveren_US
dc.author.detailsKim Kopenhaver Haidet, PhD, RNC, CRNP, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA, email: kkh1@psu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162125-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To examine linkages between biological and behavioral determinants of stress vulnerability in preterm infants. Theoretical Framework: Als' Synactive Theory will be used 1) to examine relationships between biological and behavioral responses to the tactile stimulation associated with nurse care giving, 2) to explore whether variations in the mu opioid receptor (MOR) gene are associated with early postnatal trajectories of stress responses, and 3) to determine if established postnatal trajectories of stress response are associated with neonatal health outcomes at one month of age. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): 60 preterm infants, without known congenital or neurological abnormality, will be enrolled in this prospective, observational study. MOR gene polymorphisms will be identified by genotyping. Morning salivary cortisols will be sampled at baseline and post-phases of standard morning nursing care on day 4-5 of life. Additionally, simultaneous real-time measurements of heart and respiratory rates, oxygen saturations and activity, state, and behavioral stress signals will be digitally recorded and quantified using the NIDCAP naturalistic observation. Resting heart rate variability will be measured at one week and one-month postnatally. Trained coders will rate behavioral-interactional data using a behavioral assessment and facial coding scale. Results: Repeated measures ANOVA will be performed to evaluate changes in stress response between rest and stress periods among gene variant groups. Hierarchical regression will be used to determine the relative contributions of cortisol, autonomic reactivity and behavioral responses on each of the health outcomes. Conclusions and Implications: This phase of research will provide important foundational information on the interaction of biological and behavioral factors associated with stress reactivity and will direct the next phase of research on testing of complementary supportive developmental approaches to preterm infant care. The translation of this knowledge to nursing practice should promote care giving interactions that support the infant's adaptive capabilities to environmental stimuli, thereby, reducing metabolic expenditures, fostering growth and development and recovery from illness.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:01:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:01:19Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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