An Analysis of Organisational and Educational Strategies in Teletuition in South Africa

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162129
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An Analysis of Organisational and Educational Strategies in Teletuition in South Africa
Author(s):
Kortenbout, Wilhelmina
Abstract:
Community and problem-based learning is being progressively advocated in the literature and in practice. A process approach to curriculum development and implementation is consistent with this; furthermore, the process approach has emphasized the need to deal with self-directed learning and specifically, also metacognition in the learning environment. In view of these trends it was necessary to ascertain their applicability and affordability. The aim of this investigation was to identify and document the approaches and mechanisms used to provide teletuition for health professionals. Personal and professional attributes of students were investigated. Subjects were professional nurses undertaking a one year diploma in community health nursing, following differing programme formats, with Programme A having a pre-set content focused curriculum and Programme B having a community and problem-based approach. The design included an extensive review of literature so as to give rise to a conceptual model for the education of health professionals. This was used to establish a protocol for conducting a multiple-embedded case study. The model constructs were: The Conceptual Programme (Base and Structure); the Student (Professional and Personal Attributes); the Context (Componenets and Relationships) and the Concrete Resources (Tutor and Teaching Resources). A range of data sources were used for each construct, including records, documents, essays written by students before and after the programme, and interviews. There were 47 students to complete Programme A and 53 to complete Programme B - these groups were comparable on socio-demographic variables. The findings indicated marked differences for each of the constructs for the two groups. For the Conceptual Programme, the pre-set content focused curriculum reflected as such in Programme A, where lectures and self-study units were used. The community and problem-based curriculum resulted in small group learning activities; both groups expressed appreciation for this, despite it having no formal place in Programme A. Professional and personal attributes were closely related and were measured by operationally defined indicators of empowerment and self-actualisation. Some trends of these attributes were found in Programme B students, whilst both groups strongly emphasized the value of accessible, decentralized education. In terms of the context, Programme A, students were limited to formal health structures, but those of the other group also used non-formal organizations. This also impacted on relationships which took on a partnership nature in Programme B only. The Concrete Resources also reflected differences, as the tutor had a typical "teacher" function in Programme A, but acted as facilitator to Programme B students. Teaching resources further reflected differences in the two Programmes, with Programme B having a total cost of R110 785 and Programme A, R76 131. Tutor costs of Programme A was only ten percent of that for Programme B, but this must be interpreted in the light of other influences described in the research report. It can be anticipated that a community and problem-based programme will cost twenty percent more than the traditional counterpart. It was also decided to adapt the model in the light of the investigation, so that the student construct could reflect professional/personal attributes as one entity, with the other being metacognition, and a new construct of access was created with elements of barriers and supports. Recommendations required further research, such as to establish the survival or de/increase of trends in empowerment/self actualization over the longer term and cognitive and language development during such a programme; more teletuition programmes and the more effective use of technology is urgently needed. This model is suited as a tool to evaluate educational programmes and should thus be used and refined. The investigation has provided valuable insights to current educational strategies and their potential.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2004
Conference Name:
Fourth Conference of the Africa Honour Society
Conference Host:
Africa Honour Society of Nursing
Description:
The Africa Honour Society of Nursing was chartered in Gaborone, Botswana on 4 August 2004 and became the Tau Lambda-at-Large Chapter of the Honor Society of Nursing, Sigma Theta Tau International.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn Analysis of Organisational and Educational Strategies in Teletuition in South Africaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKortenbout, Wilhelminaen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162129-
dc.description.abstractCommunity and problem-based learning is being progressively advocated in the literature and in practice. A process approach to curriculum development and implementation is consistent with this; furthermore, the process approach has emphasized the need to deal with self-directed learning and specifically, also metacognition in the learning environment. In view of these trends it was necessary to ascertain their applicability and affordability. The aim of this investigation was to identify and document the approaches and mechanisms used to provide teletuition for health professionals. Personal and professional attributes of students were investigated. Subjects were professional nurses undertaking a one year diploma in community health nursing, following differing programme formats, with Programme A having a pre-set content focused curriculum and Programme B having a community and problem-based approach. The design included an extensive review of literature so as to give rise to a conceptual model for the education of health professionals. This was used to establish a protocol for conducting a multiple-embedded case study. The model constructs were: The Conceptual Programme (Base and Structure); the Student (Professional and Personal Attributes); the Context (Componenets and Relationships) and the Concrete Resources (Tutor and Teaching Resources). A range of data sources were used for each construct, including records, documents, essays written by students before and after the programme, and interviews. There were 47 students to complete Programme A and 53 to complete Programme B - these groups were comparable on socio-demographic variables. The findings indicated marked differences for each of the constructs for the two groups. For the Conceptual Programme, the pre-set content focused curriculum reflected as such in Programme A, where lectures and self-study units were used. The community and problem-based curriculum resulted in small group learning activities; both groups expressed appreciation for this, despite it having no formal place in Programme A. Professional and personal attributes were closely related and were measured by operationally defined indicators of empowerment and self-actualisation. Some trends of these attributes were found in Programme B students, whilst both groups strongly emphasized the value of accessible, decentralized education. In terms of the context, Programme A, students were limited to formal health structures, but those of the other group also used non-formal organizations. This also impacted on relationships which took on a partnership nature in Programme B only. The Concrete Resources also reflected differences, as the tutor had a typical "teacher" function in Programme A, but acted as facilitator to Programme B students. Teaching resources further reflected differences in the two Programmes, with Programme B having a total cost of R110 785 and Programme A, R76 131. Tutor costs of Programme A was only ten percent of that for Programme B, but this must be interpreted in the light of other influences described in the research report. It can be anticipated that a community and problem-based programme will cost twenty percent more than the traditional counterpart. It was also decided to adapt the model in the light of the investigation, so that the student construct could reflect professional/personal attributes as one entity, with the other being metacognition, and a new construct of access was created with elements of barriers and supports. Recommendations required further research, such as to establish the survival or de/increase of trends in empowerment/self actualization over the longer term and cognitive and language development during such a programme; more teletuition programmes and the more effective use of technology is urgently needed. This model is suited as a tool to evaluate educational programmes and should thus be used and refined. The investigation has provided valuable insights to current educational strategies and their potential.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T09:53:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T09:53:44Z-
dc.conference.date2004en_US
dc.conference.nameFourth Conference of the Africa Honour Societyen_US
dc.conference.hostAfrica Honour Society of Nursingen_US
dc.descriptionThe Africa Honour Society of Nursing was chartered in Gaborone, Botswana on 4 August 2004 and became the Tau Lambda-at-Large Chapter of the Honor Society of Nursing, Sigma Theta Tau International.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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