2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162146
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Minimizing Attrition: Strategies for Assisting Students Who are Considering Withdrawal
Author(s):
Park, Caroline; Perry, B.; Edwards, M.
Author Details:
Caroline Park, RN, PhD, Associate Professor, Athabasca University, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, email: clpark@athabascau.ca; B. Perry; M. Edwards
Abstract:
CASN Nursing Academic Leadership Conference: This presentation focuses on strategies to assist online graduate students who are considering withdrawing from their programs of study. It is based on research on factors influencing students' decisions to withdraw (Perry et al., 2008) and assumptions held in relation to persistence and attrition rates (Park et al., 2007). Perry et al. found personal reasons (often related to life or work commitments) and program reasons (usually related to learning style and fit with career) caused students to consider withdrawal. With a better understanding of these factors and more precise definitions of attrition and persistence it became possible to develop strategies to enhance persistence rates. Strategies presented relate to course design, course delivery, and program organization and are aimed at reducing attrition rates to maximize use of resources. Also reviewed are strategies to ease the re-integration of students who have withdrawn and subsequently return to their programs. Rovai's (2002) Composite Persistence Model is used as a framework for analysis and for generation of recommended strategies. Although the foundational research focused on the Athabasca University's Centre for Nursing and Health Studies online graduate program, strategies that were drawn from this research should inform leaders of both online and traditional graduate programs.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
CASN Nursing Academic Leadership Conference
Conference Host:
Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing
Conference Location:
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Description:
Conference theme: Nursing Academic Leadership in Action; Strategies for Success, 8 - 11 May, 2008. Held at the Hilton Downtown, Toronto.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMinimizing Attrition: Strategies for Assisting Students Who are Considering Withdrawalen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPark, Carolineen_US
dc.contributor.authorPerry, B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorEdwards, M.en_US
dc.author.detailsCaroline Park, RN, PhD, Associate Professor, Athabasca University, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, email: clpark@athabascau.ca; B. Perry; M. Edwardsen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162146-
dc.description.abstractCASN Nursing Academic Leadership Conference: This presentation focuses on strategies to assist online graduate students who are considering withdrawing from their programs of study. It is based on research on factors influencing students' decisions to withdraw (Perry et al., 2008) and assumptions held in relation to persistence and attrition rates (Park et al., 2007). Perry et al. found personal reasons (often related to life or work commitments) and program reasons (usually related to learning style and fit with career) caused students to consider withdrawal. With a better understanding of these factors and more precise definitions of attrition and persistence it became possible to develop strategies to enhance persistence rates. Strategies presented relate to course design, course delivery, and program organization and are aimed at reducing attrition rates to maximize use of resources. Also reviewed are strategies to ease the re-integration of students who have withdrawn and subsequently return to their programs. Rovai's (2002) Composite Persistence Model is used as a framework for analysis and for generation of recommended strategies. Although the foundational research focused on the Athabasca University's Centre for Nursing and Health Studies online graduate program, strategies that were drawn from this research should inform leaders of both online and traditional graduate programs.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T09:57:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T09:57:44Z-
dc.conference.date2008-
dc.conference.nameCASN Nursing Academic Leadership Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostCanadian Association of Schools of Nursingen_US
dc.conference.locationToronto, Ontario, Canadaen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Nursing Academic Leadership in Action; Strategies for Success, 8 - 11 May, 2008. Held at the Hilton Downtown, Toronto.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.