2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162178
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Emotional and Social Intelligence in Nursing: A Review of the Literature
Author(s):
Duffy, Lynne
Author Details:
Dr. Lynne Duffy, RN, PhD, University of New Brunswick, Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada, email: lduffy@unb.ca
Abstract:
A fourth-year student asks how she will manage the many emotional issues of patient care. Health care institutions are asking for nurses who can respond positively to continuous change and increasing complexity and diversity, while providing leadership within an interdisciplinary team. Conflict, levels of stress and cases of burnout are increasing while institutions grapple with nursing shortages and the challenges of attracting and retaining nurses. Meanwhile student nurses often leave a program for non grade-related reasons. All these scenarios have something in common - they speak to the need to examine our educational efforts in preparing nurses for a different context than in earlier years. Considerable research suggests improved emotional and social intelligence is a critical part of the solution. While we are a cognitively smarter generation with IQs higher by 40 points, the bad news is our EQ or emotional intelligence levels are lower. This presentation provides an overview of emotional and social intelligence and why nurse educators, practitioners, and researchers need to pay more attention to the concepts. They do not replace cognitive and skills learning, but may be critical to preparing more effective, resilient, and compassionate students and graduate nurses who can meet the new demands.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
CASN Nursing Research Conference
Conference Host:
Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing
Conference Location:
Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEmotional and Social Intelligence in Nursing: A Review of the Literatureen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDuffy, Lynneen_US
dc.author.detailsDr. Lynne Duffy, RN, PhD, University of New Brunswick, Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada, email: lduffy@unb.caen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162178-
dc.description.abstractA fourth-year student asks how she will manage the many emotional issues of patient care. Health care institutions are asking for nurses who can respond positively to continuous change and increasing complexity and diversity, while providing leadership within an interdisciplinary team. Conflict, levels of stress and cases of burnout are increasing while institutions grapple with nursing shortages and the challenges of attracting and retaining nurses. Meanwhile student nurses often leave a program for non grade-related reasons. All these scenarios have something in common - they speak to the need to examine our educational efforts in preparing nurses for a different context than in earlier years. Considerable research suggests improved emotional and social intelligence is a critical part of the solution. While we are a cognitively smarter generation with IQs higher by 40 points, the bad news is our EQ or emotional intelligence levels are lower. This presentation provides an overview of emotional and social intelligence and why nurse educators, practitioners, and researchers need to pay more attention to the concepts. They do not replace cognitive and skills learning, but may be critical to preparing more effective, resilient, and compassionate students and graduate nurses who can meet the new demands.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T09:58:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T09:58:19Z-
dc.conference.date2009-
dc.conference.nameCASN Nursing Research Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostCanadian Association of Schools of Nursingen_US
dc.conference.locationMoncton, New Brunswick, Canadaen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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