2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162181
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Intention to Mentor: What Constitutes a Good Mentor and Why Do They Mentor?
Author(s):
Ferguson, Linda; Rohatinsky, Noelle; Risling, Tracie; Myrick, Flo; Yonge, Olive
Author Details:
Dr. Linda Ferguson, RN, PhD, College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, email: linda.ferguson@usask.ca; Noelle Rohatinsky; Tracie Risling; Flo Myrick; Olive Yonge
Abstract:
In this mixed methods study, we explored the demographic correlates of the intention to mentor new nurses into nursing practice. Using survey method, nurses, both experienced and new, were asked to identify their beliefs about mentoring, the expected costs and benefits of mentoring, and their intentions to mentor new nurses. In addition, these beliefs about mentoring and intentions to mentor were also correlated with their perceptions of the workplace, using the Nursing Worklife Index Revised (Aiken & Patrician, 2000). In the qualitative portion of the study, using Grounded Theory, we explored the nature of mentoring in nursing, recognizing the differences in mentoring nurses into professional practice as compared to mentoring an individual for progress within the hierarchy of an organization. Using these two approaches, we report on the nature of mentoring in nursing, and identify the demographic profiles of those nurses who are interested in mentoring new nurses in practice. This information has health human resource implications in the design of formal mentoring programs, and for those HHR policies designed to recruit or retain nurses in practice. A number of previously held assumptions are challenged by the findings of this research.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
CASN Nursing Research Conference
Conference Host:
Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing
Conference Location:
Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Intention to Mentor: What Constitutes a Good Mentor and Why Do They Mentor?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorFerguson, Lindaen_US
dc.contributor.authorRohatinsky, Noelleen_US
dc.contributor.authorRisling, Tracieen_US
dc.contributor.authorMyrick, Floen_US
dc.contributor.authorYonge, Oliveen_US
dc.author.detailsDr. Linda Ferguson, RN, PhD, College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, email: linda.ferguson@usask.ca; Noelle Rohatinsky; Tracie Risling; Flo Myrick; Olive Yongeen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162181-
dc.description.abstractIn this mixed methods study, we explored the demographic correlates of the intention to mentor new nurses into nursing practice. Using survey method, nurses, both experienced and new, were asked to identify their beliefs about mentoring, the expected costs and benefits of mentoring, and their intentions to mentor new nurses. In addition, these beliefs about mentoring and intentions to mentor were also correlated with their perceptions of the workplace, using the Nursing Worklife Index Revised (Aiken & Patrician, 2000). In the qualitative portion of the study, using Grounded Theory, we explored the nature of mentoring in nursing, recognizing the differences in mentoring nurses into professional practice as compared to mentoring an individual for progress within the hierarchy of an organization. Using these two approaches, we report on the nature of mentoring in nursing, and identify the demographic profiles of those nurses who are interested in mentoring new nurses in practice. This information has health human resource implications in the design of formal mentoring programs, and for those HHR policies designed to recruit or retain nurses in practice. A number of previously held assumptions are challenged by the findings of this research.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T09:58:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T09:58:23Z-
dc.conference.date2009-
dc.conference.nameCASN Nursing Research Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostCanadian Association of Schools of Nursingen_US
dc.conference.locationMoncton, New Brunswick, Canadaen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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