Critical Overload: The Incidence and Impact of Admitted Patients in the Emergency Department

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162186
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Critical Overload: The Incidence and Impact of Admitted Patients in the Emergency Department
Author(s):
Hodgins, Marilyn; Moore, Nicole
Author Details:
Marilyn Hodgins, RN, PhD, Associate Professor, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada, email: mhodgins@unb.ca; Nicole Moore
Abstract:
"Care at the breaking point" is a phrase used to describe conditions within emergency departments (EDs) as staff struggle to respond to the needs of those seeking healthcare. A factor identified as a key contributor to this situation is the holding or boarding of admitted patients. According to the Canadian Institute for Health Information, 60% of hospitalized patients are admitted through the ED and the median time that admitted patients board in the ED before transfer to an inpatient unit is four hours, with 1 in 25 waiting longer than 24 hours. To gain a better understanding of the incidence and impact of admitted patients in the ED, we examined one year of administrative data. Data for 44,102 ED visits were analyzed with 17% resulting in hospital admission (7,607 admissions). Slightly more than half (54%) of these admissions were boarded for more than two hours with 14% spending their entire hospital stay in the department. We will discuss the results and implications of our analysis which suggests the boarding of admitted patients impacts outcomes not only for patients who are treated and released from the ED but also for those who are admitted to hospital.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
CASN Nursing Research Conference
Conference Host:
Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing
Conference Location:
Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCritical Overload: The Incidence and Impact of Admitted Patients in the Emergency Departmenten_GB
dc.contributor.authorHodgins, Marilynen_US
dc.contributor.authorMoore, Nicoleen_US
dc.author.detailsMarilyn Hodgins, RN, PhD, Associate Professor, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada, email: mhodgins@unb.ca; Nicole Mooreen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162186-
dc.description.abstract"Care at the breaking point" is a phrase used to describe conditions within emergency departments (EDs) as staff struggle to respond to the needs of those seeking healthcare. A factor identified as a key contributor to this situation is the holding or boarding of admitted patients. According to the Canadian Institute for Health Information, 60% of hospitalized patients are admitted through the ED and the median time that admitted patients board in the ED before transfer to an inpatient unit is four hours, with 1 in 25 waiting longer than 24 hours. To gain a better understanding of the incidence and impact of admitted patients in the ED, we examined one year of administrative data. Data for 44,102 ED visits were analyzed with 17% resulting in hospital admission (7,607 admissions). Slightly more than half (54%) of these admissions were boarded for more than two hours with 14% spending their entire hospital stay in the department. We will discuss the results and implications of our analysis which suggests the boarding of admitted patients impacts outcomes not only for patients who are treated and released from the ED but also for those who are admitted to hospital.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T09:58:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T09:58:29Z-
dc.conference.date2009-
dc.conference.nameCASN Nursing Research Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostCanadian Association of Schools of Nursingen_US
dc.conference.locationMoncton, New Brunswick, Canadaen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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