2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162188
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Paradox in a Graduate Program Delivered On-Line in a Human Science Curriculum
Author(s):
Jeffrey, Janet; Singh, Mina; Lindsay, Gail
Author Details:
Janet Jeffrey, RN, PhD, Associate Professor, York University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, email: jjeffrey@yorku.ca; Mina Singh; Gail Lindsay
Abstract:
To accomplish the mandate of accountability in evidence-based nursing education, we conducted program evaluation of the new online masters (MScN) program that is participatory with both formative (improve the quality of the program) and summative (determine the worth of the program) components. Stakeholders included the first cohort of enrolled students and faculty who taught in the first year of program. Quantitative and qualitative data collection approaches provide richness and context, and maximize usefulness of the results. Tools for program evaluation include self-assessment (questionnaires), reflective journals, and discussion in focus groups. Congruence between themes identified for both students and faculty confirm the paradox that exists between delivery of online education within a human science curriculum. In the context of a philosophy that values lived experience and relationship as the basis of nursing, faculty and students engage in an environment that is disembodied, technology-based, and at a distance. Challenges in getting and staying connected will be explored in addition to the development of teaching in an online environment with emerging curricular issues. The apparent paradox of teaching human science curriculum online will be presented and discussed in detail from what we have learned and continue to learn.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
CASN Nursing Research Conference
Conference Host:
Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing
Conference Location:
Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleParadox in a Graduate Program Delivered On-Line in a Human Science Curriculumen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJeffrey, Janeten_US
dc.contributor.authorSingh, Minaen_US
dc.contributor.authorLindsay, Gailen_US
dc.author.detailsJanet Jeffrey, RN, PhD, Associate Professor, York University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, email: jjeffrey@yorku.ca; Mina Singh; Gail Lindsayen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162188-
dc.description.abstractTo accomplish the mandate of accountability in evidence-based nursing education, we conducted program evaluation of the new online masters (MScN) program that is participatory with both formative (improve the quality of the program) and summative (determine the worth of the program) components. Stakeholders included the first cohort of enrolled students and faculty who taught in the first year of program. Quantitative and qualitative data collection approaches provide richness and context, and maximize usefulness of the results. Tools for program evaluation include self-assessment (questionnaires), reflective journals, and discussion in focus groups. Congruence between themes identified for both students and faculty confirm the paradox that exists between delivery of online education within a human science curriculum. In the context of a philosophy that values lived experience and relationship as the basis of nursing, faculty and students engage in an environment that is disembodied, technology-based, and at a distance. Challenges in getting and staying connected will be explored in addition to the development of teaching in an online environment with emerging curricular issues. The apparent paradox of teaching human science curriculum online will be presented and discussed in detail from what we have learned and continue to learn.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T09:58:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T09:58:31Z-
dc.conference.date2009-
dc.conference.nameCASN Nursing Research Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostCanadian Association of Schools of Nursingen_US
dc.conference.locationMoncton, New Brunswick, Canadaen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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