Intertwining Technological Advances and Traditional Pedagogies: Challenges and Opportunities

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162189
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Intertwining Technological Advances and Traditional Pedagogies: Challenges and Opportunities
Author(s):
King, Mary Lou; Stanyon, Wendy; Baxter, Pamela
Author Details:
Dr. Mary Lou King, RN, BScN, MScN, PhD, Assistant Professor, Arthur Labatt School of Nursing, London, Ontario, Canada, email: mking39@uwo.ca; Dr. Wendy Stanyon; Dr. Pamela Baxter
Abstract:
Twenty-first century simulation equipment is transforming teaching-learning environments. Nurse educators are confronting a new reality as they integrate modern technology with traditional pedagogy. We summarize results of a 3-year, province-wide program evaluation to assess the use of clinical simulation in Ontario Schools of Nursing following a $20 million investment from the Ministry of Health and Long Term Care. Using a mixed method design, our inter-professional research team captured information about the art and science of simulation in nursing education. Survey data obtained from 34 schools at two points in time provided insights about equipment usage, as well as faculty perceptions about the impact of simulation on student remediation and demand on clinical agencies. Focus group informants shared perspectives about the teaching-learning experience of students and faculty, and also highlighted logistical issues arising from the use of simulation. Research subjects completing a Q-sort exercise further illuminated patterns of faculty and student responses to simulation. A quasi-experimental trial documented the impact of high and low fidelity simulators on students' psychomotor skills, critical thinking and ability to respond to clinical emergencies. Overall study findings reinforce the challenges and opportunities associated with intertwining past and present teaching-learning modalities in a changing education-practice context.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
CASN Nursing Research Conference
Conference Host:
Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing
Conference Location:
Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIntertwining Technological Advances and Traditional Pedagogies: Challenges and Opportunitiesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKing, Mary Louen_US
dc.contributor.authorStanyon, Wendyen_US
dc.contributor.authorBaxter, Pamelaen_US
dc.author.detailsDr. Mary Lou King, RN, BScN, MScN, PhD, Assistant Professor, Arthur Labatt School of Nursing, London, Ontario, Canada, email: mking39@uwo.ca; Dr. Wendy Stanyon; Dr. Pamela Baxteren_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162189-
dc.description.abstractTwenty-first century simulation equipment is transforming teaching-learning environments. Nurse educators are confronting a new reality as they integrate modern technology with traditional pedagogy. We summarize results of a 3-year, province-wide program evaluation to assess the use of clinical simulation in Ontario Schools of Nursing following a $20 million investment from the Ministry of Health and Long Term Care. Using a mixed method design, our inter-professional research team captured information about the art and science of simulation in nursing education. Survey data obtained from 34 schools at two points in time provided insights about equipment usage, as well as faculty perceptions about the impact of simulation on student remediation and demand on clinical agencies. Focus group informants shared perspectives about the teaching-learning experience of students and faculty, and also highlighted logistical issues arising from the use of simulation. Research subjects completing a Q-sort exercise further illuminated patterns of faculty and student responses to simulation. A quasi-experimental trial documented the impact of high and low fidelity simulators on students' psychomotor skills, critical thinking and ability to respond to clinical emergencies. Overall study findings reinforce the challenges and opportunities associated with intertwining past and present teaching-learning modalities in a changing education-practice context.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T09:58:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T09:58:33Z-
dc.conference.date2009-
dc.conference.nameCASN Nursing Research Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostCanadian Association of Schools of Nursingen_US
dc.conference.locationMoncton, New Brunswick, Canadaen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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