2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162193
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Reaching Out: Knowledge Dissemination in Rural and Remote First Nation Communities
Author(s):
MacDonald, Barbara; Del Pino, Marlene; Sabiston, Cynthia
Author Details:
Barbara MacDonald, RN, BSN, CDE, Aboriginal Diabetes Initiative Regional Coordinator, Health Canada, First Nations and Inuit Health, Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada, email: barbara_macdonald@hc-sc.gc.ca; Marlene Del Pino; Cynthia Sabiston
Abstract:
Movement towards evidence-based practice is dependent on its timely dissemination and knowledge translation. The remote locations of many First Nation Communities make dissemination a challenge. In the fall of 2008, the Canadian Diabetes Association (CDA) released its updated Clinical Practice Guidelines. The CDA recognizes that uptake of the guidelines into practice needs more effective dissemination. Diabetes rates in First Nation (FN) Communities far exceed national averages, creating long-term social and economic burdens. Evidenced based practice needs to be prioritized for this high-risk population. The Aboriginal Diabetes Initiative (ADI) is a federally funded program which aims to reduce the incidence and prevalence of diabetes among Aboriginal people. In Saskatchewan, the ADI supports innovative approaches to address issues related to diabetes. The SK Regional ADI team partnered with St. Elizabeth Health Care (SEHC) and @YourSide Colleague (aYSC) to increase awareness of the CDA guidelines and to bring them to life in an online interactive platform. SEHC is a charitable, not-for-profit health care organization, @YourSide Colleague is an innovative online program provided to support geographically dispersed health workers in FN communities. E-learning has the capacity to reach out and promote knowledge dissemination in remote communities.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
CASN Nursing Research Conference
Conference Host:
Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing
Conference Location:
Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleReaching Out: Knowledge Dissemination in Rural and Remote First Nation Communitiesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMacDonald, Barbaraen_US
dc.contributor.authorDel Pino, Marleneen_US
dc.contributor.authorSabiston, Cynthiaen_US
dc.author.detailsBarbara MacDonald, RN, BSN, CDE, Aboriginal Diabetes Initiative Regional Coordinator, Health Canada, First Nations and Inuit Health, Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada, email: barbara_macdonald@hc-sc.gc.ca; Marlene Del Pino; Cynthia Sabistonen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162193-
dc.description.abstractMovement towards evidence-based practice is dependent on its timely dissemination and knowledge translation. The remote locations of many First Nation Communities make dissemination a challenge. In the fall of 2008, the Canadian Diabetes Association (CDA) released its updated Clinical Practice Guidelines. The CDA recognizes that uptake of the guidelines into practice needs more effective dissemination. Diabetes rates in First Nation (FN) Communities far exceed national averages, creating long-term social and economic burdens. Evidenced based practice needs to be prioritized for this high-risk population. The Aboriginal Diabetes Initiative (ADI) is a federally funded program which aims to reduce the incidence and prevalence of diabetes among Aboriginal people. In Saskatchewan, the ADI supports innovative approaches to address issues related to diabetes. The SK Regional ADI team partnered with St. Elizabeth Health Care (SEHC) and @YourSide Colleague (aYSC) to increase awareness of the CDA guidelines and to bring them to life in an online interactive platform. SEHC is a charitable, not-for-profit health care organization, @YourSide Colleague is an innovative online program provided to support geographically dispersed health workers in FN communities. E-learning has the capacity to reach out and promote knowledge dissemination in remote communities.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T09:58:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T09:58:37Z-
dc.conference.date2009-
dc.conference.nameCASN Nursing Research Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostCanadian Association of Schools of Nursingen_US
dc.conference.locationMoncton, New Brunswick, Canadaen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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