2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162195
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Workplace Abuse Challenges Both Workers and Work Environments
Author(s):
MacIntosh, Judith; Wuest, J.; Merritt-Gray, M.
Author Details:
Judith MacIntosh, BN, MScN, PhD, Professor, Faculty of Nursing, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada, email: macintsh@unb.ca; J. Wuest; M. Merritt-Gray
Abstract:
Over half of Canadian women work but the benefits of working are often compromised by experiencing workplace abuse. Broadly, workplace abuse is repeated unwanted or unreasonable behaviour and includes physical, sexual, or psychological threats, harassment, or hostility. Bullies may be male or female, supervisors, co-workers, subordinates, or clients. We know that workplace abuse distresses workers and that emotional and mental health problems cost Canada $4.5 billion annually in productivity and account for 1/3 of disability claims (Dewa et al., 2004). How workplace abuse and its consequences influence women's engagement in the workforce is, however, unknown. To expand knowledge of how workplace abuse affects women's engagement, we conducted a grounded theory study with 37 NB women who had experienced workplace abuse. The central problem for these women is that they cannot continue to work as before. Abuse interferes with approaches to work, diminishes energy levels, limits abilities to accomplish usual work, and has many consequences. We called the four stage process women use to manage this Doing Work Differently. The four stages are: being conciliatory, validating perceptions, reducing interference, and redeveloping balance. Influences on this process are health effects of abuse and support. This presentation will discuss stages, influences, and implications of the process for women who have been abused at work and for employers.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
CASN Nursing Research Conference
Conference Host:
Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing
Conference Location:
Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWorkplace Abuse Challenges Both Workers and Work Environmentsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMacIntosh, Judithen_US
dc.contributor.authorWuest, J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMerritt-Gray, M.en_US
dc.author.detailsJudith MacIntosh, BN, MScN, PhD, Professor, Faculty of Nursing, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada, email: macintsh@unb.ca; J. Wuest; M. Merritt-Grayen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162195-
dc.description.abstractOver half of Canadian women work but the benefits of working are often compromised by experiencing workplace abuse. Broadly, workplace abuse is repeated unwanted or unreasonable behaviour and includes physical, sexual, or psychological threats, harassment, or hostility. Bullies may be male or female, supervisors, co-workers, subordinates, or clients. We know that workplace abuse distresses workers and that emotional and mental health problems cost Canada $4.5 billion annually in productivity and account for 1/3 of disability claims (Dewa et al., 2004). How workplace abuse and its consequences influence women's engagement in the workforce is, however, unknown. To expand knowledge of how workplace abuse affects women's engagement, we conducted a grounded theory study with 37 NB women who had experienced workplace abuse. The central problem for these women is that they cannot continue to work as before. Abuse interferes with approaches to work, diminishes energy levels, limits abilities to accomplish usual work, and has many consequences. We called the four stage process women use to manage this Doing Work Differently. The four stages are: being conciliatory, validating perceptions, reducing interference, and redeveloping balance. Influences on this process are health effects of abuse and support. This presentation will discuss stages, influences, and implications of the process for women who have been abused at work and for employers.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T09:58:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T09:58:39Z-
dc.conference.date2009-
dc.conference.nameCASN Nursing Research Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostCanadian Association of Schools of Nursingen_US
dc.conference.locationMoncton, New Brunswick, Canadaen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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