Contesting Our Taken-for-Granted Knowledge of Student Evaluation: Insights from a Team of Institutional Ethnographers

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162196
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Contesting Our Taken-for-Granted Knowledge of Student Evaluation: Insights from a Team of Institutional Ethnographers
Author(s):
Malinsky, Lynn; Rankin, Janet; Tate, Betty; Shorting, Linda
Author Details:
Lynn Malinsky, RN, BSN, MPH, Assistant Professor, UBC Okanagan, Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada, email: lynn.malinsky@ubc.ca; Janet Rankin; Betty Tate; Linda Shorting
Abstract:
Educating for nursing excellence is fraught with contextual challenges and paradigmatic tensions; one of the troubling centers of attention for nurse educators is their evaluation of student practice. This paper on institutional ethnographic research outlines how a team of nurse educators from seven educational institutions took on the task of empirically examining some of the assumptions and understandings about their evaluation practices. We describe some of the troubles teachers encounter in evaluation work and disrupt the conventional explanations nurse educators use to rationalize and mediate what happens in their work with students who fail to meet the required standards. Institutional ethnography provided the framework for our research team to investigate the day-to-day activities of student practice evaluation and to recognize the entanglement of ruling relations inherent in our worksites. We question whether the relational pedagogy of our nursing curriculum is subordinated to ideological practices organized by the discourses of due process. The study moved us collectively towards a new and critical analysis of the way we evaluate student nurses and advanced our professional practice. By sharing our research we illuminate a path for other nurses to whom institutional ethnography offers a politic to examine troubling aspects of nursing practice.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
CASN Nursing Research Conference
Conference Host:
Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing
Conference Location:
Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleContesting Our Taken-for-Granted Knowledge of Student Evaluation: Insights from a Team of Institutional Ethnographersen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMalinsky, Lynnen_US
dc.contributor.authorRankin, Janeten_US
dc.contributor.authorTate, Bettyen_US
dc.contributor.authorShorting, Lindaen_US
dc.author.detailsLynn Malinsky, RN, BSN, MPH, Assistant Professor, UBC Okanagan, Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada, email: lynn.malinsky@ubc.ca; Janet Rankin; Betty Tate; Linda Shortingen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162196-
dc.description.abstractEducating for nursing excellence is fraught with contextual challenges and paradigmatic tensions; one of the troubling centers of attention for nurse educators is their evaluation of student practice. This paper on institutional ethnographic research outlines how a team of nurse educators from seven educational institutions took on the task of empirically examining some of the assumptions and understandings about their evaluation practices. We describe some of the troubles teachers encounter in evaluation work and disrupt the conventional explanations nurse educators use to rationalize and mediate what happens in their work with students who fail to meet the required standards. Institutional ethnography provided the framework for our research team to investigate the day-to-day activities of student practice evaluation and to recognize the entanglement of ruling relations inherent in our worksites. We question whether the relational pedagogy of our nursing curriculum is subordinated to ideological practices organized by the discourses of due process. The study moved us collectively towards a new and critical analysis of the way we evaluate student nurses and advanced our professional practice. By sharing our research we illuminate a path for other nurses to whom institutional ethnography offers a politic to examine troubling aspects of nursing practice.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T09:58:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T09:58:40Z-
dc.conference.date2009-
dc.conference.nameCASN Nursing Research Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostCanadian Association of Schools of Nursingen_US
dc.conference.locationMoncton, New Brunswick, Canadaen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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