2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162197
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Bridging What Divides Us: Mentoring Nurse Educators in the 21st Century
Author(s):
McChesney, Jayne; Boychuk Duchscher, Judy; Rodger, Kathy; Moyer, Katarzyna; Olfert, Marg
Author Details:
Jayne McChesney, RN, BScN, MN, PhD, Facilitator - Scholarly Projects and Programs, SIAST Nursing Division, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, email: jayne.mcchesney@siast.sk.ca; Judy Boychuk Duchscher; Kathy Rodger; Katarzyna Moyer; Marg Olfert
Abstract:
Canadian undergraduate nursing education programs are facing looming faculty shortages, dictating an urgent need for innovative approaches to recruiting and retaining both experienced and novice nurse educators. In 2007, the Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Science and Technology (SIAST) Nursing Division, in collaboration with Saskatchewan Health initiated the Faculty 80-20 Mentorship Project. The primary intent of this project was to ease the experience of transition for novice faculty members and facilitate an increased sense of value and worth for their seasoned mentors. A mixed method approach was used to evaluate this project. A total of 10 individual and focused group interviews were conducted over a 3 week period, transcribed verbatim and then exposed to a constant comparative analysis, revealing three essential themes: mentoring, being mentored, and participating in a mentoring relationship. Three validated instruments were used to ascertain the relationships in job satisfaction, intent to stay and behavioural commitment between those participating in mentoring activity and remaining faculty. Overall findings demonstrated strong positive correlations between participation in mentoring activity and intent to stay. This paper reviews the key findings as they relate to the implementation of a professional faculty mentorship program and offers recommendations for future consideration.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
CASN Nursing Research Conference
Conference Host:
Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing
Conference Location:
Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBridging What Divides Us: Mentoring Nurse Educators in the 21st Centuryen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcChesney, Jayneen_US
dc.contributor.authorBoychuk Duchscher, Judyen_US
dc.contributor.authorRodger, Kathyen_US
dc.contributor.authorMoyer, Katarzynaen_US
dc.contributor.authorOlfert, Margen_US
dc.author.detailsJayne McChesney, RN, BScN, MN, PhD, Facilitator - Scholarly Projects and Programs, SIAST Nursing Division, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, email: jayne.mcchesney@siast.sk.ca; Judy Boychuk Duchscher; Kathy Rodger; Katarzyna Moyer; Marg Olferten_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162197-
dc.description.abstractCanadian undergraduate nursing education programs are facing looming faculty shortages, dictating an urgent need for innovative approaches to recruiting and retaining both experienced and novice nurse educators. In 2007, the Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Science and Technology (SIAST) Nursing Division, in collaboration with Saskatchewan Health initiated the Faculty 80-20 Mentorship Project. The primary intent of this project was to ease the experience of transition for novice faculty members and facilitate an increased sense of value and worth for their seasoned mentors. A mixed method approach was used to evaluate this project. A total of 10 individual and focused group interviews were conducted over a 3 week period, transcribed verbatim and then exposed to a constant comparative analysis, revealing three essential themes: mentoring, being mentored, and participating in a mentoring relationship. Three validated instruments were used to ascertain the relationships in job satisfaction, intent to stay and behavioural commitment between those participating in mentoring activity and remaining faculty. Overall findings demonstrated strong positive correlations between participation in mentoring activity and intent to stay. This paper reviews the key findings as they relate to the implementation of a professional faculty mentorship program and offers recommendations for future consideration.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T09:58:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T09:58:41Z-
dc.conference.date2009-
dc.conference.nameCASN Nursing Research Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostCanadian Association of Schools of Nursingen_US
dc.conference.locationMoncton, New Brunswick, Canadaen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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