2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162198
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Decolonization of Nursing Education: A Paradigm Shift for the New Millennium
Author(s):
McGibbon, Elizabeth; Barton, Sylvia; Didham, Paula; Mulaudzi, Fhumulani Mavis; Smith, Dawn
Author Details:
Dr. Elizabeth McGibbon, RN, PhD, St. Francis Xavier University, School of Nursing, Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Canada, email: emcgibbo@stfx.ca; Sylvia Barton; Paula Didham; Mavis Malaudzi; Dawn Smith
Abstract:
Aim: Explore decolonization, advocate for a paradigm shift for nursing education. Background: Colonization's legacy has significant health impacts on colonized peoples. This paper describes how colonization has influenced nursing education, and emphasizes the urgent need to engage in a process of decolonization. An international group of nurse educators and researchers explore the transformative implications of decolonizing processes. We are concerned with the "perverse longevity" of colonialism and persisting colonial hierarchies of knowledge and values that reinforce what Edward Said calls the "dreadful secondariness of some people and cultures". Method: Systematic literature search on decolonization, nursing and health impacts. An intersectionality lens was used to explore interlocking oppressions such as sexism, classism, racism. Results: Themes included: emphasis on critical theories; race/racism; research as a method of recolonization or transformation; and nursing education as a colonizing institution. Implications: Despite growing emphasis on these themes, real change in nursing education has not happened. Power neutral approaches to our work, and the absence of the historical contexts of colonization, combine to create and maintain inequities that are inconsistent with nursing's professional values. Further research and praxis on antiracist and decolonizing knowledge and methods are necessary to create a paradigm shift towards decolonization of nursing.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
CASN Nursing Research Conference
Conference Host:
Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing
Conference Location:
Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDecolonization of Nursing Education: A Paradigm Shift for the New Millenniumen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcGibbon, Elizabethen_US
dc.contributor.authorBarton, Sylviaen_US
dc.contributor.authorDidham, Paulaen_US
dc.contributor.authorMulaudzi, Fhumulani Mavisen_US
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Dawnen_US
dc.author.detailsDr. Elizabeth McGibbon, RN, PhD, St. Francis Xavier University, School of Nursing, Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Canada, email: emcgibbo@stfx.ca; Sylvia Barton; Paula Didham; Mavis Malaudzi; Dawn Smithen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162198-
dc.description.abstractAim: Explore decolonization, advocate for a paradigm shift for nursing education. Background: Colonization's legacy has significant health impacts on colonized peoples. This paper describes how colonization has influenced nursing education, and emphasizes the urgent need to engage in a process of decolonization. An international group of nurse educators and researchers explore the transformative implications of decolonizing processes. We are concerned with the "perverse longevity" of colonialism and persisting colonial hierarchies of knowledge and values that reinforce what Edward Said calls the "dreadful secondariness of some people and cultures". Method: Systematic literature search on decolonization, nursing and health impacts. An intersectionality lens was used to explore interlocking oppressions such as sexism, classism, racism. Results: Themes included: emphasis on critical theories; race/racism; research as a method of recolonization or transformation; and nursing education as a colonizing institution. Implications: Despite growing emphasis on these themes, real change in nursing education has not happened. Power neutral approaches to our work, and the absence of the historical contexts of colonization, combine to create and maintain inequities that are inconsistent with nursing's professional values. Further research and praxis on antiracist and decolonizing knowledge and methods are necessary to create a paradigm shift towards decolonization of nursing.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T09:58:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T09:58:42Z-
dc.conference.date2009-
dc.conference.nameCASN Nursing Research Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostCanadian Association of Schools of Nursingen_US
dc.conference.locationMoncton, New Brunswick, Canadaen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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