Experienced Registered Nurses Wanted: Are Organizations Recruiting the Best Mentors for the Job?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162208
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Experienced Registered Nurses Wanted: Are Organizations Recruiting the Best Mentors for the Job?
Author(s):
Rohatinsky, Noelle; Ferguson, Linda
Author Details:
Noelle Rohatinsky, RN, MN, University of Saskatchewan, College of Nursing, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, email: noelle.rohatinsky@usask.ca; Linda Ferguson
Abstract:
To support recruitment and retention of nurses in healthcare, organizations are using formal mentoring programs. However, when it comes to the role of mentor, are organizations recruiting the most appropriate people for the job? A descriptive correlational study was completed to describe the mentoring perceptions of registered nurses based on their years of nursing practice, age, gender, and education level. Research found that age, years of nursing practice, and education level influenced mentoring perceptions. Nurses with greater years of nursing practice perceived increased costs for mentoring and were least willing to mentor. Conversely, nurses with fewer years of experience perceived fewer costs for mentoring and were more willing to mentor. Typically, senior nurses are recruited to mentor new staff, and yet this research suggests nurses with three to five years of experience may be a more appropriate choice. To maximize the influence of mentoring programs, healthcare organizations may want to re-examine their mentor recruitment practices. Utilizing less experienced nurses as mentors that are committed to process, may positively influence mentoring relationships. Senior nursing staff could then be offered to share their extensive knowledge in a more personally fulfilling way, possibly influencing their retention also. A mentorship win for all involved.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
CASN Nursing Research Conference
Conference Host:
Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing
Conference Location:
Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExperienced Registered Nurses Wanted: Are Organizations Recruiting the Best Mentors for the Job?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorRohatinsky, Noelleen_US
dc.contributor.authorFerguson, Lindaen_US
dc.author.detailsNoelle Rohatinsky, RN, MN, University of Saskatchewan, College of Nursing, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, email: noelle.rohatinsky@usask.ca; Linda Fergusonen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162208-
dc.description.abstractTo support recruitment and retention of nurses in healthcare, organizations are using formal mentoring programs. However, when it comes to the role of mentor, are organizations recruiting the most appropriate people for the job? A descriptive correlational study was completed to describe the mentoring perceptions of registered nurses based on their years of nursing practice, age, gender, and education level. Research found that age, years of nursing practice, and education level influenced mentoring perceptions. Nurses with greater years of nursing practice perceived increased costs for mentoring and were least willing to mentor. Conversely, nurses with fewer years of experience perceived fewer costs for mentoring and were more willing to mentor. Typically, senior nurses are recruited to mentor new staff, and yet this research suggests nurses with three to five years of experience may be a more appropriate choice. To maximize the influence of mentoring programs, healthcare organizations may want to re-examine their mentor recruitment practices. Utilizing less experienced nurses as mentors that are committed to process, may positively influence mentoring relationships. Senior nursing staff could then be offered to share their extensive knowledge in a more personally fulfilling way, possibly influencing their retention also. A mentorship win for all involved.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T09:58:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T09:58:54Z-
dc.conference.date2009-
dc.conference.nameCASN Nursing Research Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostCanadian Association of Schools of Nursingen_US
dc.conference.locationMoncton, New Brunswick, Canadaen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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