2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162215
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Intimate Partner Violence and Cardiovascular Risk: Is There a Link?
Author(s):
Scott-Storey, Kelly
Author Details:
Kelly Scott-Storey, MN, CNS, Interdisciplinary PhD Student, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada, email: gstorey@nb.sympatico.ca
Abstract:
Intimate partner violence creates environmental stress that continues after a woman leaves an abusive relationship. Persistent stress is associated with the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, the leading single cause of death among women. Smoking, an established risk factor for cardiovascular disease, is a coping mechanism commonly used to decrease the anxiety and stress of intimate partner violence. However, cardiovascular health is poorly understood in abused women. Our purpose was to provide a descriptive profile of cardiovascular risk for women who have left abusive partners and to report the relationships among intimate partner violence, smoking, and cardiovascular risk. Descriptive secondary analysis of data collected between 2004 and 2005 on a community sample of 309 women who had separated from an abusive partner within the previous 3 years was conducted to create a profile of cardiovascular risk. Bivariate tests of association and logistic regression analysis were used to test relationships among the variables. The prevalence of hypertension, obesity and smoking suggest that survivors of intimate partner violence may be at heightened risk for cardiovascular disease and warrant clinical attention. Understanding intimate partner violence as an environmental risk illuminates abused women as an important target group for cardiovascular disease prevention strategies by nurses.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
CASN Nursing Research Conference
Conference Host:
Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing
Conference Location:
Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIntimate Partner Violence and Cardiovascular Risk: Is There a Link?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorScott-Storey, Kellyen_US
dc.author.detailsKelly Scott-Storey, MN, CNS, Interdisciplinary PhD Student, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada, email: gstorey@nb.sympatico.caen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162215-
dc.description.abstractIntimate partner violence creates environmental stress that continues after a woman leaves an abusive relationship. Persistent stress is associated with the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, the leading single cause of death among women. Smoking, an established risk factor for cardiovascular disease, is a coping mechanism commonly used to decrease the anxiety and stress of intimate partner violence. However, cardiovascular health is poorly understood in abused women. Our purpose was to provide a descriptive profile of cardiovascular risk for women who have left abusive partners and to report the relationships among intimate partner violence, smoking, and cardiovascular risk. Descriptive secondary analysis of data collected between 2004 and 2005 on a community sample of 309 women who had separated from an abusive partner within the previous 3 years was conducted to create a profile of cardiovascular risk. Bivariate tests of association and logistic regression analysis were used to test relationships among the variables. The prevalence of hypertension, obesity and smoking suggest that survivors of intimate partner violence may be at heightened risk for cardiovascular disease and warrant clinical attention. Understanding intimate partner violence as an environmental risk illuminates abused women as an important target group for cardiovascular disease prevention strategies by nurses.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T09:59:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T09:59:02Z-
dc.conference.date2009-
dc.conference.nameCASN Nursing Research Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostCanadian Association of Schools of Nursingen_US
dc.conference.locationMoncton, New Brunswick, Canadaen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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