2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162223
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Understanding Mechanisms of Chronic Pain in Women Survivors of Intimate Partner Violence
Author(s):
Wuest, Judith; Merritt-Gray, M.; Ford-Gilboe, M.; Varcoe, C.; Wilk, P.; Lent, B.; Campbell, J. C.
Author Details:
Judith Wuest, RN PhD, Professor, University of New Brunswick, Faculty of Nursing, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada, email: wuest@unb.ca; M. Merritt-Gray; M. Ford-Gilboe; C. Varcoe; P. Wilk; B. Lent; J. C. Campbell
Abstract:
Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a major public health problem rooted in a social environment that sanctions violence against women. Although chronic pain is more prevalent in women who have experienced IPV versus those who have not, and bivariate associations among abuse severity, abuse-related injury, depressive symptoms, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, and chronic pain are established, no research has examined the multivariate relationships among these factors. Using data from a community sample of 309 Canadian women survivors of IPV living in British Columbia, New Brunswick and Ontario, we describe the pattern of chronic pain in terms of severity, location, frequency, interference, and medication use. We examined how abuse-related injury, severity of depressive symptoms, and severity of PTSD symptoms mediate the effects of child abuse and IPV severity on chronic pain severity using structural equation modeling techniques. Our results show that all three mediators significantly influenced the relationships between abuse severity and chronic pain severity. Our findings add to current knowledge regarding how violence against women is a determinant of health, particularly in terms of lifetime abuse experience and types of abuse. The implications for the assessment, treatment and management of chronic pain in survivors of IPV will be discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
CASN Nursing Research Conference
Conference Host:
Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing
Conference Location:
Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUnderstanding Mechanisms of Chronic Pain in Women Survivors of Intimate Partner Violenceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWuest, Judithen_US
dc.contributor.authorMerritt-Gray, M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFord-Gilboe, M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorVarcoe, C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWilk, P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLent, B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCampbell, J. C.en_US
dc.author.detailsJudith Wuest, RN PhD, Professor, University of New Brunswick, Faculty of Nursing, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada, email: wuest@unb.ca; M. Merritt-Gray; M. Ford-Gilboe; C. Varcoe; P. Wilk; B. Lent; J. C. Campbellen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162223-
dc.description.abstractIntimate partner violence (IPV) is a major public health problem rooted in a social environment that sanctions violence against women. Although chronic pain is more prevalent in women who have experienced IPV versus those who have not, and bivariate associations among abuse severity, abuse-related injury, depressive symptoms, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, and chronic pain are established, no research has examined the multivariate relationships among these factors. Using data from a community sample of 309 Canadian women survivors of IPV living in British Columbia, New Brunswick and Ontario, we describe the pattern of chronic pain in terms of severity, location, frequency, interference, and medication use. We examined how abuse-related injury, severity of depressive symptoms, and severity of PTSD symptoms mediate the effects of child abuse and IPV severity on chronic pain severity using structural equation modeling techniques. Our results show that all three mediators significantly influenced the relationships between abuse severity and chronic pain severity. Our findings add to current knowledge regarding how violence against women is a determinant of health, particularly in terms of lifetime abuse experience and types of abuse. The implications for the assessment, treatment and management of chronic pain in survivors of IPV will be discussed.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T09:59:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T09:59:09Z-
dc.conference.date2009-
dc.conference.nameCASN Nursing Research Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostCanadian Association of Schools of Nursingen_US
dc.conference.locationMoncton, New Brunswick, Canadaen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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