2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162229
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Simulation in Nursing Education: Preparation for "Real Life"?
Author(s):
Baxter, Pamela; Landeen, J.; Musson, D.; Norman, G.; Peachey, G.
Author Details:
Pamela Baxter, RN, BA, BScN, MSc, PhD, Assistant Professor, McMaster University, School of Nursing, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, email: baxterp@mcmaster.ca; J. Landeen; D. Musson; G. Norman; G. Peachey
Abstract:
This study is part of a multi-site evaluation of clinical simulation in nursing education in Ontario. The purpose of this phase was to answer the following research questions: 1) Do different levels of fidelity in simulation influence a senior nursing student?s level of confidence, competence, decision making, communication, collaboration and psychomotor skills when faced with a simulated "real-life" clinical critical incident? 2) How effective is simulation in preparing senior level nursing students for "real-life" clinical critical incidents? Fourth year nursing students were randomly assigned to one of three groups. Two groups participated in a 2-hour teaching session involving a critical incident. The low-fidelity group received instruction via videotape and the high-fidelity group participated in a "hands on" experience using SimMan. The control group received no instruction. Students were evaluated using an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) involving SimMan and a standardized patient to reflect a "life-like" clinical setting. Students transitioned through three OSCE stations involving a different scenario that required the students to transfer their knowledge. Students completed a pre and post-test to determine the effect of simulation on their self-perceived levels of confidence and competence.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
CASN Nurse Educators Conference
Conference Host:
Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing
Conference Location:
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
Description:
Held 4 - 7 November, 2007.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSimulation in Nursing Education: Preparation for "Real Life"?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorBaxter, Pamelaen_US
dc.contributor.authorLandeen, J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMusson, D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNorman, G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPeachey, G.en_US
dc.author.detailsPamela Baxter, RN, BA, BScN, MSc, PhD, Assistant Professor, McMaster University, School of Nursing, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, email: baxterp@mcmaster.ca; J. Landeen; D. Musson; G. Norman; G. Peacheyen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162229-
dc.description.abstractThis study is part of a multi-site evaluation of clinical simulation in nursing education in Ontario. The purpose of this phase was to answer the following research questions: 1) Do different levels of fidelity in simulation influence a senior nursing student?s level of confidence, competence, decision making, communication, collaboration and psychomotor skills when faced with a simulated "real-life" clinical critical incident? 2) How effective is simulation in preparing senior level nursing students for "real-life" clinical critical incidents? Fourth year nursing students were randomly assigned to one of three groups. Two groups participated in a 2-hour teaching session involving a critical incident. The low-fidelity group received instruction via videotape and the high-fidelity group participated in a "hands on" experience using SimMan. The control group received no instruction. Students were evaluated using an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) involving SimMan and a standardized patient to reflect a "life-like" clinical setting. Students transitioned through three OSCE stations involving a different scenario that required the students to transfer their knowledge. Students completed a pre and post-test to determine the effect of simulation on their self-perceived levels of confidence and competence.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T09:59:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T09:59:16Z-
dc.conference.date2007-
dc.conference.nameCASN Nurse Educators Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostCanadian Association of Schools of Nursingen_US
dc.conference.locationKingston, Ontario, Canadaen_US
dc.descriptionHeld 4 - 7 November, 2007.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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