2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162231
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Clickers in the Classroom: Innovative Technology in Large Classes
Author(s):
Beekhoo, Zoraida; Burcher, Betty; Barry, Maureen; Fegan, Mary Ann
Author Details:
Zoraida Beekhoo, RN, MA, Lecturer, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, email: zoraida.beekhoo@utoronto.ca; Betty Burcher; Maureen Barry; Mary Ann Fegan
Abstract:
This presentation describes a pilot project that involves the use of clickers in four undergraduate nursing courses. Clickers or Classroom Response Systems are a user-friendly technology in which students vote using hand-held clickers, similar to the TV game show "Who wants to be a millionaire?" A multiple choice question is displayed using PowerPoint; the students vote individually or use peer-instruction methods to choose the correct answer. The vote is quickly compiled and displayed in histogram form. The teacher can then divide the class into discussion groups based on responses, review the material or discuss the responses. Since all students learn more effectively when they are actively engaged, using this technology encourages active learning, is responsive to diverse learning styles and offers immediate feedback to teachers and students (Harrison, 2007 & Skiba, 2006). According to Schackow et al (2004), clickers are also associated with improved retention rates of factual information. In this pilot, three courses elicited answers to content-related questions while the politics and health care class elicited opinions. From our positive preliminary results from students and instructors, this innovation encourages best practices in teaching and learning and can easily be replicated in other programs.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
CASN Nurse Educators Conference
Conference Host:
Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing
Conference Location:
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
Description:
Held 4 - 7 November, 2007.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleClickers in the Classroom: Innovative Technology in Large Classesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBeekhoo, Zoraidaen_US
dc.contributor.authorBurcher, Bettyen_US
dc.contributor.authorBarry, Maureenen_US
dc.contributor.authorFegan, Mary Annen_US
dc.author.detailsZoraida Beekhoo, RN, MA, Lecturer, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, email: zoraida.beekhoo@utoronto.ca; Betty Burcher; Maureen Barry; Mary Ann Feganen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162231-
dc.description.abstractThis presentation describes a pilot project that involves the use of clickers in four undergraduate nursing courses. Clickers or Classroom Response Systems are a user-friendly technology in which students vote using hand-held clickers, similar to the TV game show "Who wants to be a millionaire?" A multiple choice question is displayed using PowerPoint; the students vote individually or use peer-instruction methods to choose the correct answer. The vote is quickly compiled and displayed in histogram form. The teacher can then divide the class into discussion groups based on responses, review the material or discuss the responses. Since all students learn more effectively when they are actively engaged, using this technology encourages active learning, is responsive to diverse learning styles and offers immediate feedback to teachers and students (Harrison, 2007 & Skiba, 2006). According to Schackow et al (2004), clickers are also associated with improved retention rates of factual information. In this pilot, three courses elicited answers to content-related questions while the politics and health care class elicited opinions. From our positive preliminary results from students and instructors, this innovation encourages best practices in teaching and learning and can easily be replicated in other programs.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T09:59:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T09:59:19Z-
dc.conference.date2007-
dc.conference.nameCASN Nurse Educators Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostCanadian Association of Schools of Nursingen_US
dc.conference.locationKingston, Ontario, Canadaen_US
dc.descriptionHeld 4 - 7 November, 2007.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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