2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162232
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Emotional-Social Intelligence Among Health Professional Students
Author(s):
Benson, Gerry; Brown, Barbara; Larin, Helene; Martin, Lynn; Ploeg, Jenny; Wessel, Jean; Williams, Renee
Author Details:
Gerry Benson, BScN, MSc, Assistant Professor, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, email: bensong@mcmaster.ca; Barbara Brown; Helene Larin; Lynn Martin; Jenny Ploeg; Jean Wessel; Renee Williams
Abstract:
Emotional-Social Intelligence (ESI) is a set of individual and social competencies associated with individual and workplace success, and encompasses many characteristics considered essential in health care professionals. Since ESI may be a teachable and learnable construct that can be improved through training, educators need to know if these competencies can be facilitated. The purpose of this cross sectional study is to determine the relationship between ESI and attributes considered essential in health professionals, namely leadership, caring and ethical decision making. One hundred and fifty four students from four programs (McMaster University: Nursing, Physiotherapy and Bachelor of Health Sciences; Ithaca College: Physiotherapy) were assessed on ESI (Bar-On Emotional Quotient: EQ-i:S), leadership ability (Self-Assessment Leadership Instrument [SALI]), caring (Caring Ability Inventory [CAI], Caring Dimensions Inventory [CDI]), and ethical decision making (Defining Issues Test [DIT]). At baseline, ESI was positively related (p<.05) to caring (CAI only), with no differences in ESI between student groups. ESI was not related to ethical decision making and was negatively related to leadership. These measures will be repeated throughout the students? programs, permitting longitudinal assessment of changes in ESI and the relationships between measures and program content.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
CASN Nurse Educators Conference
Conference Host:
Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing
Conference Location:
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
Description:
Held 4 - 7 November, 2007.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEmotional-Social Intelligence Among Health Professional Studentsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBenson, Gerryen_US
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Barbaraen_US
dc.contributor.authorLarin, Heleneen_US
dc.contributor.authorMartin, Lynnen_US
dc.contributor.authorPloeg, Jennyen_US
dc.contributor.authorWessel, Jeanen_US
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Reneeen_US
dc.author.detailsGerry Benson, BScN, MSc, Assistant Professor, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, email: bensong@mcmaster.ca; Barbara Brown; Helene Larin; Lynn Martin; Jenny Ploeg; Jean Wessel; Renee Williamsen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162232-
dc.description.abstractEmotional-Social Intelligence (ESI) is a set of individual and social competencies associated with individual and workplace success, and encompasses many characteristics considered essential in health care professionals. Since ESI may be a teachable and learnable construct that can be improved through training, educators need to know if these competencies can be facilitated. The purpose of this cross sectional study is to determine the relationship between ESI and attributes considered essential in health professionals, namely leadership, caring and ethical decision making. One hundred and fifty four students from four programs (McMaster University: Nursing, Physiotherapy and Bachelor of Health Sciences; Ithaca College: Physiotherapy) were assessed on ESI (Bar-On Emotional Quotient: EQ-i:S), leadership ability (Self-Assessment Leadership Instrument [SALI]), caring (Caring Ability Inventory [CAI], Caring Dimensions Inventory [CDI]), and ethical decision making (Defining Issues Test [DIT]). At baseline, ESI was positively related (p<.05) to caring (CAI only), with no differences in ESI between student groups. ESI was not related to ethical decision making and was negatively related to leadership. These measures will be repeated throughout the students? programs, permitting longitudinal assessment of changes in ESI and the relationships between measures and program content.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T09:59:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T09:59:20Z-
dc.conference.date2007-
dc.conference.nameCASN Nurse Educators Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostCanadian Association of Schools of Nursingen_US
dc.conference.locationKingston, Ontario, Canadaen_US
dc.descriptionHeld 4 - 7 November, 2007.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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