2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162240
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Measuring the Use of Evidence Based Clinical Decision Support Within Nursing Curriculum
Author(s):
Caswell, Wenda; Stacey, D.; Menard, P.; Murray, M. A.; Graham, I. D.
Author Details:
Wenda Caswell, RN, BScN, MEd, Lecturer, University of Ottawa, School of Nursing, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, email: wcaswell@uottawa.ca; D. Stacey; P. Menard; M. A. Murray; I. D. Graham
Abstract:
Background: Patient decision support is a fundamental element of best nursing practices for providing client centred care. Embedding evidence-based (EB) decision support within undergraduate curriculum is necessary to prepare nurses for supporting patient decision-making. Objective: To evaluate the integration of EB decision support resources, clinical research skills and related theories across nursing curriculum. Method: An audit of nursing course outlines (n=34) within a 4 year undergraduate program. The Evidence-based Curriculum Audit tool was developed to systematically determine the extent to which each course outline included: 1) EB resources to support decision-making, 2) clinical decision-making skills, and 3) theory content. The tool was piloted and revisions made. Course outlines were audited using the tool and data were analyzed descriptively. Findings: The resources used most often were: textbooks (n=26), opinion leaders (n=17), practice guidelines (n=9). The most commonly described clinical decision making skills were application to practice (n=26) and reflective practice skills (n=19). Only one course outline included patient decision support theory. Conclusion: There was considerable variability in the inclusion of EB resources, research concepts, and related theories within the course outlines. Findings provide a baseline for monitoring change following implementation of strategies to enhance the explicit use of evidence.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
CASN Nurse Educators Conference
Conference Host:
Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing
Conference Location:
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
Description:
Held 4 - 7 November, 2007.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMeasuring the Use of Evidence Based Clinical Decision Support Within Nursing Curriculumen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCaswell, Wendaen_US
dc.contributor.authorStacey, D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMenard, P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMurray, M. A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGraham, I. D.en_US
dc.author.detailsWenda Caswell, RN, BScN, MEd, Lecturer, University of Ottawa, School of Nursing, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, email: wcaswell@uottawa.ca; D. Stacey; P. Menard; M. A. Murray; I. D. Grahamen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162240-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Patient decision support is a fundamental element of best nursing practices for providing client centred care. Embedding evidence-based (EB) decision support within undergraduate curriculum is necessary to prepare nurses for supporting patient decision-making. Objective: To evaluate the integration of EB decision support resources, clinical research skills and related theories across nursing curriculum. Method: An audit of nursing course outlines (n=34) within a 4 year undergraduate program. The Evidence-based Curriculum Audit tool was developed to systematically determine the extent to which each course outline included: 1) EB resources to support decision-making, 2) clinical decision-making skills, and 3) theory content. The tool was piloted and revisions made. Course outlines were audited using the tool and data were analyzed descriptively. Findings: The resources used most often were: textbooks (n=26), opinion leaders (n=17), practice guidelines (n=9). The most commonly described clinical decision making skills were application to practice (n=26) and reflective practice skills (n=19). Only one course outline included patient decision support theory. Conclusion: There was considerable variability in the inclusion of EB resources, research concepts, and related theories within the course outlines. Findings provide a baseline for monitoring change following implementation of strategies to enhance the explicit use of evidence.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T09:59:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T09:59:28Z-
dc.conference.date2007-
dc.conference.nameCASN Nurse Educators Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostCanadian Association of Schools of Nursingen_US
dc.conference.locationKingston, Ontario, Canadaen_US
dc.descriptionHeld 4 - 7 November, 2007.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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