2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162267
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Analyzing Cognitive Demands of Clinical Simulation Scenarios
Author(s):
Higuchi, Kathryn; Cragg, Betty; Foulds, Barbara; Hust, Carmen; Batliwalla, Sharon; Miller, Tammy
Author Details:
Kathryn Higuchi, PhD, RN, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, email: khiguchi@uottawa.ca; Betty Cragg; Barbara Foulds; Carmen Hust; Sharon Batliwalla; Tammy Miller
Abstract:
Simulation has been used in health professions education for many years. Instructional strategies for using high fidelity simulation manikins have primarily focused on medical procedures (e.g. intubation during anesthesia), with limited application to nursing roles and responsibilities. The recent development of high-fidelity patient manikins that can be programmed to respond physiologically, based on patient conditions or student interventions, have resulted in a new enthusiasm for simulation as an instructional strategy in nursing programs. This presentation will discuss a project designed to develop, test, and evaluate clinical scenarios for use with high fidelity clinical simulators in undergraduate clinical courses. The focus of the project was on the development of cognitive skills and the leveling of scenarios to stimulate students at different stages in their programs to achieve new levels of practice. Case scenarios were tested in a simulation environment with second and third year students and instructors. Video-tapes of groups of 2-3 students enacting scenarios were analyzed for expected and actual responses to patient cues. Key events were also analyzed for cognitive complexity based on the model of thinking processes used in higher education (Donald, 1992; 2002). Study results and implications for clinical teaching and learning will be presented.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
CASN Nurse Educators Conference
Conference Host:
Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing
Conference Location:
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
Description:
Held 4 - 7 November, 2007.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAnalyzing Cognitive Demands of Clinical Simulation Scenariosen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHiguchi, Kathrynen_US
dc.contributor.authorCragg, Bettyen_US
dc.contributor.authorFoulds, Barbaraen_US
dc.contributor.authorHust, Carmenen_US
dc.contributor.authorBatliwalla, Sharonen_US
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Tammyen_US
dc.author.detailsKathryn Higuchi, PhD, RN, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, email: khiguchi@uottawa.ca; Betty Cragg; Barbara Foulds; Carmen Hust; Sharon Batliwalla; Tammy Milleren_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162267-
dc.description.abstractSimulation has been used in health professions education for many years. Instructional strategies for using high fidelity simulation manikins have primarily focused on medical procedures (e.g. intubation during anesthesia), with limited application to nursing roles and responsibilities. The recent development of high-fidelity patient manikins that can be programmed to respond physiologically, based on patient conditions or student interventions, have resulted in a new enthusiasm for simulation as an instructional strategy in nursing programs. This presentation will discuss a project designed to develop, test, and evaluate clinical scenarios for use with high fidelity clinical simulators in undergraduate clinical courses. The focus of the project was on the development of cognitive skills and the leveling of scenarios to stimulate students at different stages in their programs to achieve new levels of practice. Case scenarios were tested in a simulation environment with second and third year students and instructors. Video-tapes of groups of 2-3 students enacting scenarios were analyzed for expected and actual responses to patient cues. Key events were also analyzed for cognitive complexity based on the model of thinking processes used in higher education (Donald, 1992; 2002). Study results and implications for clinical teaching and learning will be presented.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T09:59:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T09:59:57Z-
dc.conference.date2007-
dc.conference.nameCASN Nurse Educators Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostCanadian Association of Schools of Nursingen_US
dc.conference.locationKingston, Ontario, Canadaen_US
dc.descriptionHeld 4 - 7 November, 2007.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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