The Value of Domestic Violence Risk Assessment for Nurses and Clients of Sexual Assault & Domestic Violence Treatment Centres

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162271
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Value of Domestic Violence Risk Assessment for Nurses and Clients of Sexual Assault & Domestic Violence Treatment Centres
Author(s):
Kaphlan, Sarah; Hilton, Zoe
Author Details:
Sarah Kaphlan, MSW, Coordinator Abuse and Sexual Assault Program, Cornwall Community Hospital, Cornwall, Ontario, Canada, email: Sarah.Kaplan@CORNWALLHOSPITAL.CA; Zoe Hilton
Abstract:
We will describe use of the Ontario Domestic Assault Risk Assessment (ODARA) at an SADV in Ontario. Nurses inevitably come across partner assault cases but are reluctant to ask about abuse for fear of a lack of follow-up care, and victims often underestimate their risk, so the ODARA helps both nurse and patient. For nurses, it supports universal screening, fits into standard discharge planning procedure, helps us communicate risk to others on the team, and can be used in the legal process. Patients get a realistic portrait of what they are likely to experience, through measurable predictors and visual graphs that help comprehension. We will describe the ODARA and its ability to predict assault. We will present the results of a study using the ODARA at the SADV, showing that these patients are a relatively high risk group who are not concurrently accessing help from shelters or the police. Thus, SADV nurses are in a unique position to help these victims. Nurse educators can help improve services for assaulted patients by teaching others to assess risk. We will demonstrate educational materials including a simulated interview video and scoring booklet.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
CASN Nurse Educators Conference
Conference Host:
Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing
Conference Location:
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
Description:
Held 4 - 7 November, 2007.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Value of Domestic Violence Risk Assessment for Nurses and Clients of Sexual Assault & Domestic Violence Treatment Centresen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKaphlan, Sarahen_US
dc.contributor.authorHilton, Zoeen_US
dc.author.detailsSarah Kaphlan, MSW, Coordinator Abuse and Sexual Assault Program, Cornwall Community Hospital, Cornwall, Ontario, Canada, email: Sarah.Kaplan@CORNWALLHOSPITAL.CA; Zoe Hiltonen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162271-
dc.description.abstractWe will describe use of the Ontario Domestic Assault Risk Assessment (ODARA) at an SADV in Ontario. Nurses inevitably come across partner assault cases but are reluctant to ask about abuse for fear of a lack of follow-up care, and victims often underestimate their risk, so the ODARA helps both nurse and patient. For nurses, it supports universal screening, fits into standard discharge planning procedure, helps us communicate risk to others on the team, and can be used in the legal process. Patients get a realistic portrait of what they are likely to experience, through measurable predictors and visual graphs that help comprehension. We will describe the ODARA and its ability to predict assault. We will present the results of a study using the ODARA at the SADV, showing that these patients are a relatively high risk group who are not concurrently accessing help from shelters or the police. Thus, SADV nurses are in a unique position to help these victims. Nurse educators can help improve services for assaulted patients by teaching others to assess risk. We will demonstrate educational materials including a simulated interview video and scoring booklet.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:00:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:00:02Z-
dc.conference.date2007-
dc.conference.nameCASN Nurse Educators Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostCanadian Association of Schools of Nursingen_US
dc.conference.locationKingston, Ontario, Canadaen_US
dc.descriptionHeld 4 - 7 November, 2007.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.