2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162281
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Helping ER Nurses Coping with Post-Traumatic Stress Symptoms - A "Tailor-Made" Solution
Author(s):
Lavoie, Stephan; Talbot, Lise R.; Mathieu, Luc
Author Details:
Stephan Lavoie, Infirmier, M.Sc., Universite de Sherbrooke, Sawyerville, Quebec, Canada, email: Stephan.Lavoie@USherbrooke.ca; Lise R. Talbot, N. psy, Ph.D; Luc Mathieu, N., DBA
Abstract:
Purpose: The work environment of ER nurses is a hard one. They regularly face critical incidents, and their personal coping mechanisms are insufficient to alleviate occupational stress, while organizational support is deemed insufficient. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) prevalence among ER nurses is higher than prevalence among the general population (12-20% vs. 4-7%). The purpose of our study was to develop a support program that would be suited to ER nurses, in order to prevent PTSD symptoms. More specifically, we have described: the critical incidents they experience, the PTSD symptoms they exhibit, the support interventions they use, the additional support they need, and finally the interventions they would like to have access to. Design: We used a qualitative-evaluative research model. Setting: The targeted environment was a university medical centre, welcoming 90,000 visits/year. Sample: Our sample, selected by reasoned choice, consisted of twelve nurses, mostly women (n=10), of average age (37 years old), with seven years of ER experience. Methodology: Data collection was conducted with a social-demographical questionnaire, one-on-one interviews, and a focus group session. Content analysis allowed us to fulfill our objectives. Result credibility was ensured by triangulating researchers, verifying results with participants, and measuring interrater reliability. All data collection and analysis documents have been maintained and filed, thus leaving an audit trail available. Results: We identified three categories of critical incidents: exposure as a witness, a victim, and context of the event. Some PTSD symptoms have been described (e.g. distress, re-experience). The more ER experience participants have, the higher number witness- or context-related incidents they report (rs=0,6, p<0,05). Also, the older participants are, the less they report PTSD symptoms (rs=-0,75, p<0.05). Participants have mentioned the importance of being able to rely on a social support network. They also feel a need to discuss more with their colleagues and be listened to. Given these results, a support program has been suggested. In primary prevention, we try to limit the sources of occupational stress. In secondary prevention, we try to limit the effects of occupational stress on healthy individuals. Finally, our objective in tertiary prevention is to limit the effects of occupational stress on individuals with psychological health issues. Some program?s interventions are: simulations, "ER Natural Helpers" mutual assistance program and training to recognize risk factors of PTSD. Conclusion: In addition to describing their work context, this program represents a practical solution tailor-suited to ER nurses. In the second stage of this research, we will implement the program and measure its impacts on them.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
CASN Nurse Educators Conference
Conference Host:
Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing
Conference Location:
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
Description:
Held 4 - 7 November, 2007.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHelping ER Nurses Coping with Post-Traumatic Stress Symptoms - A "Tailor-Made" Solutionen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLavoie, Stephanen_US
dc.contributor.authorTalbot, Lise R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMathieu, Lucen_US
dc.author.detailsStephan Lavoie, Infirmier, M.Sc., Universite de Sherbrooke, Sawyerville, Quebec, Canada, email: Stephan.Lavoie@USherbrooke.ca; Lise R. Talbot, N. psy, Ph.D; Luc Mathieu, N., DBAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162281-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The work environment of ER nurses is a hard one. They regularly face critical incidents, and their personal coping mechanisms are insufficient to alleviate occupational stress, while organizational support is deemed insufficient. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) prevalence among ER nurses is higher than prevalence among the general population (12-20% vs. 4-7%). The purpose of our study was to develop a support program that would be suited to ER nurses, in order to prevent PTSD symptoms. More specifically, we have described: the critical incidents they experience, the PTSD symptoms they exhibit, the support interventions they use, the additional support they need, and finally the interventions they would like to have access to. Design: We used a qualitative-evaluative research model. Setting: The targeted environment was a university medical centre, welcoming 90,000 visits/year. Sample: Our sample, selected by reasoned choice, consisted of twelve nurses, mostly women (n=10), of average age (37 years old), with seven years of ER experience. Methodology: Data collection was conducted with a social-demographical questionnaire, one-on-one interviews, and a focus group session. Content analysis allowed us to fulfill our objectives. Result credibility was ensured by triangulating researchers, verifying results with participants, and measuring interrater reliability. All data collection and analysis documents have been maintained and filed, thus leaving an audit trail available. Results: We identified three categories of critical incidents: exposure as a witness, a victim, and context of the event. Some PTSD symptoms have been described (e.g. distress, re-experience). The more ER experience participants have, the higher number witness- or context-related incidents they report (rs=0,6, p&lt;0,05). Also, the older participants are, the less they report PTSD symptoms (rs=-0,75, p&lt;0.05). Participants have mentioned the importance of being able to rely on a social support network. They also feel a need to discuss more with their colleagues and be listened to. Given these results, a support program has been suggested. In primary prevention, we try to limit the sources of occupational stress. In secondary prevention, we try to limit the effects of occupational stress on healthy individuals. Finally, our objective in tertiary prevention is to limit the effects of occupational stress on individuals with psychological health issues. Some program?s interventions are: simulations, "ER Natural Helpers" mutual assistance program and training to recognize risk factors of PTSD. Conclusion: In addition to describing their work context, this program represents a practical solution tailor-suited to ER nurses. In the second stage of this research, we will implement the program and measure its impacts on them.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:00:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:00:12Z-
dc.conference.date2007-
dc.conference.nameCASN Nurse Educators Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostCanadian Association of Schools of Nursingen_US
dc.conference.locationKingston, Ontario, Canadaen_US
dc.descriptionHeld 4 - 7 November, 2007.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.