Learning Maternity Nursing Work: The "Scary" Experiences of New RNs Working in Rural Hospitals in B.C.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162286
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Learning Maternity Nursing Work: The "Scary" Experiences of New RNs Working in Rural Hospitals in B.C.
Author(s):
MacKinnon, Karen
Author Details:
Karen MacKinnon, RN, PhD, PNC, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, email: kamackin@uvic.ca
Abstract:
Maternity care is an important part of primary health care services and new graduates of our nursing programs are being hired to work in acute care hospitals in rural communities and small towns across Canada. Their work frequently includes providing nursing care for childbearing women and their families. This paper presents some of the findings from two rural nursing research projects that focused on the work of nurses who provide maternity care in British Columbia. This research adopts the standpoint of these rural nurses. Our interviews and observations with these front-line nurses focused on their work activities, on what nurses actually do, and on the nurses' experiences of providing nursing care in their community. The nurses who expressed the most distress about providing maternity care were new registered nurses working in rural hospitals who had less than five years nursing experience. New nurses told us that providing maternity care was a "very scary" experience and that they did not have sufficient preparation in their undergraduate nursing programs to safely do this work. It is time to revisit maternity nursing education in our undergraduate programs and explore the spaces between generalist and specialty nursing practice.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
CASN Nurse Educators Conference
Conference Host:
Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing
Conference Location:
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
Description:
Held 4 - 7 November, 2007.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLearning Maternity Nursing Work: The "Scary" Experiences of New RNs Working in Rural Hospitals in B.C.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorMacKinnon, Karenen_US
dc.author.detailsKaren MacKinnon, RN, PhD, PNC, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, email: kamackin@uvic.caen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162286-
dc.description.abstractMaternity care is an important part of primary health care services and new graduates of our nursing programs are being hired to work in acute care hospitals in rural communities and small towns across Canada. Their work frequently includes providing nursing care for childbearing women and their families. This paper presents some of the findings from two rural nursing research projects that focused on the work of nurses who provide maternity care in British Columbia. This research adopts the standpoint of these rural nurses. Our interviews and observations with these front-line nurses focused on their work activities, on what nurses actually do, and on the nurses' experiences of providing nursing care in their community. The nurses who expressed the most distress about providing maternity care were new registered nurses working in rural hospitals who had less than five years nursing experience. New nurses told us that providing maternity care was a "very scary" experience and that they did not have sufficient preparation in their undergraduate nursing programs to safely do this work. It is time to revisit maternity nursing education in our undergraduate programs and explore the spaces between generalist and specialty nursing practice.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:00:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:00:17Z-
dc.conference.date2007-
dc.conference.nameCASN Nurse Educators Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostCanadian Association of Schools of Nursingen_US
dc.conference.locationKingston, Ontario, Canadaen_US
dc.descriptionHeld 4 - 7 November, 2007.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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