2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162316
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Overcoming Reality Shock: Orientation is a key
Author(s):
van den Berg, Riek; Frazer, Nancy
Author Details:
Riek van den Berg, RN, MScN, Corporate Coordinator - Nursing Education, The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, email: rvandenberg@ottawahospital.on.ca; Nancy Frazer
Abstract:
How do you bring large numbers of new graduates into an established workforce and have everyone get along? The high rate of new nurses leaving their first job and the profession is a cost that our society can not afford. At The Ottawa Hospital (TOH), 300 nurses joined our team in May and June of 2007. Over 200 of these nurses were new graduates from across Canada. The others came with a range of experiences and ages. They joined our team of 3900 nurses in two groups, one each month. Our challenge? To provide an orientation that was relevant, welcoming, interactive and effective to such a large and diverse group! We changed our orientation processes to take advantage of this challenge. The amount of participatory and small group learning was increased. Harnessing technology and addressing the multiple generations of learners in the group were key components, as were the social events held to introduce the new staff to our senior management team, the clinical directors, their managers and their nurse educators. The collaboration with nursing and other partners paid off! We will present our strategies, results of our follow-up with the orientees, lessons learned and our future plans.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
CASN Nurse Educators Conference
Conference Host:
Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing
Conference Location:
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
Description:
Held 4 - 7 November, 2007.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOvercoming Reality Shock: Orientation is a keyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorvan den Berg, Rieken_US
dc.contributor.authorFrazer, Nancyen_US
dc.author.detailsRiek van den Berg, RN, MScN, Corporate Coordinator - Nursing Education, The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, email: rvandenberg@ottawahospital.on.ca; Nancy Frazeren_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162316-
dc.description.abstractHow do you bring large numbers of new graduates into an established workforce and have everyone get along? The high rate of new nurses leaving their first job and the profession is a cost that our society can not afford. At The Ottawa Hospital (TOH), 300 nurses joined our team in May and June of 2007. Over 200 of these nurses were new graduates from across Canada. The others came with a range of experiences and ages. They joined our team of 3900 nurses in two groups, one each month. Our challenge? To provide an orientation that was relevant, welcoming, interactive and effective to such a large and diverse group! We changed our orientation processes to take advantage of this challenge. The amount of participatory and small group learning was increased. Harnessing technology and addressing the multiple generations of learners in the group were key components, as were the social events held to introduce the new staff to our senior management team, the clinical directors, their managers and their nurse educators. The collaboration with nursing and other partners paid off! We will present our strategies, results of our follow-up with the orientees, lessons learned and our future plans.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:00:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:00:52Z-
dc.conference.date2007-
dc.conference.nameCASN Nurse Educators Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostCanadian Association of Schools of Nursingen_US
dc.conference.locationKingston, Ontario, Canadaen_US
dc.descriptionHeld 4 - 7 November, 2007.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.