2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162338
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Going Back to Our Roots: Nurses as Leaders in Advocacy for the Prerequisites of Health
Author(s):
Daiski, Isolde
Author Details:
Dr. Isolde Daiski, RN, BScN, EdD, York University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, email: idaiski@yorku.ca
Abstract:
CASN Nursing Academic Leadership Conference: Florence Nightingale was a political activist, who recognized that illness largely originates in the societal environment. She believed that nurses needed to pay attention to, and help improve, their patients' living situations. Historically, with increasing medicalization of nursing, linking health to the wider societal context was lost. Hospital nurses focused on physical needs of the sick, while Public Health nurses admonished clients to change their behaviours and life styles. Yet, many are unable to live healthy lives due to lack of resources. With the current dramatic rise in poverty levels amongst diverse marginalized groups chronic diseases are rampant while healthcare costs are spinning out of control. Nurses have a moral obligation to promote health for all. With marginalized and poor clients, social activism is needed. At the frontlines this means recognizing needs and ensuring the necessities of healthy lives. Professional nurses associations can provide powerful, collective support for vulnerable clients, by proposing / endorsing policies that guarantee the prerequisites of health, such as affordable, livable housing and adequate incomes. To prepare nurses for effectively resuming leadership roles in health promotion, educational strategies are proposed for learning about the impact of marginalization and poverty on health and on practicing ethical advocacy.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
CASN Nursing Academic Leadership Conference
Conference Host:
Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing
Conference Location:
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Description:
Conference theme: Nursing Academic Leadership in Action; Strategies for Success, 8 - 11 May, 2008. Held at the Hilton Downtown, Toronto.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGoing Back to Our Roots: Nurses as Leaders in Advocacy for the Prerequisites of Healthen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDaiski, Isoldeen_US
dc.author.detailsDr. Isolde Daiski, RN, BScN, EdD, York University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, email: idaiski@yorku.caen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162338-
dc.description.abstractCASN Nursing Academic Leadership Conference: Florence Nightingale was a political activist, who recognized that illness largely originates in the societal environment. She believed that nurses needed to pay attention to, and help improve, their patients' living situations. Historically, with increasing medicalization of nursing, linking health to the wider societal context was lost. Hospital nurses focused on physical needs of the sick, while Public Health nurses admonished clients to change their behaviours and life styles. Yet, many are unable to live healthy lives due to lack of resources. With the current dramatic rise in poverty levels amongst diverse marginalized groups chronic diseases are rampant while healthcare costs are spinning out of control. Nurses have a moral obligation to promote health for all. With marginalized and poor clients, social activism is needed. At the frontlines this means recognizing needs and ensuring the necessities of healthy lives. Professional nurses associations can provide powerful, collective support for vulnerable clients, by proposing / endorsing policies that guarantee the prerequisites of health, such as affordable, livable housing and adequate incomes. To prepare nurses for effectively resuming leadership roles in health promotion, educational strategies are proposed for learning about the impact of marginalization and poverty on health and on practicing ethical advocacy.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:01:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:01:16Z-
dc.conference.date2008-
dc.conference.nameCASN Nursing Academic Leadership Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostCanadian Association of Schools of Nursingen_US
dc.conference.locationToronto, Ontario, Canadaen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Nursing Academic Leadership in Action; Strategies for Success, 8 - 11 May, 2008. Held at the Hilton Downtown, Toronto.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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