2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162349
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Vanishing Nursing Professoriate: How Do We Ensure Replacement?
Author(s):
Iwasiw, Carroll L.
Author Details:
Dr. Caroll L. Iwasiw, RN, MScN, EdD, University of Western Ontario, School of Nursing, London, Ontario, Canada, email: ciwasiw@uwo.ca
Abstract:
CASN Nursing Academic Leadership Conference: Nursing programs need highly skilled and educated nurses who can facilitate learning, meet diverse learning needs of students, conduct research, and mentor less-experienced colleagues. As the nursing faculty shortage grows, university nursing educators and administrators are challenged to replace the vanishing nursing professoriate. They must inspire motivation for a career in academic nursing, develop new faculty, attract qualified nurses to faculty positions, and stimulate the creation of work environments that will retain new and experienced faculty. Among strategies to be considered for creation of a new cadre of university nursing faculty are undergraduate student involvement in faculty research; sponsorship of graduate students by schools of nursing; and flexible delivery of graduate programs. Strategies for retention of faculty can include mentoring of new academics by professor emeritae; flexible employment arrangements; organized development programs for new faculty; and formal linkages between tenured and clinical faculty. The role of the dean or director as the negotiator of faculty worklife will be addressed.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
CASN Nursing Academic Leadership Conference
Conference Host:
Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing
Conference Location:
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Description:
Conference theme: Nursing Academic Leadership in Action; Strategies for Success, 8 - 11 May, 2008. Held at the Hilton Downtown, Toronto.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Vanishing Nursing Professoriate: How Do We Ensure Replacement?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorIwasiw, Carroll L.en_US
dc.author.detailsDr. Caroll L. Iwasiw, RN, MScN, EdD, University of Western Ontario, School of Nursing, London, Ontario, Canada, email: ciwasiw@uwo.caen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162349-
dc.description.abstractCASN Nursing Academic Leadership Conference: Nursing programs need highly skilled and educated nurses who can facilitate learning, meet diverse learning needs of students, conduct research, and mentor less-experienced colleagues. As the nursing faculty shortage grows, university nursing educators and administrators are challenged to replace the vanishing nursing professoriate. They must inspire motivation for a career in academic nursing, develop new faculty, attract qualified nurses to faculty positions, and stimulate the creation of work environments that will retain new and experienced faculty. Among strategies to be considered for creation of a new cadre of university nursing faculty are undergraduate student involvement in faculty research; sponsorship of graduate students by schools of nursing; and flexible delivery of graduate programs. Strategies for retention of faculty can include mentoring of new academics by professor emeritae; flexible employment arrangements; organized development programs for new faculty; and formal linkages between tenured and clinical faculty. The role of the dean or director as the negotiator of faculty worklife will be addressed.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:01:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:01:27Z-
dc.conference.date2008-
dc.conference.nameCASN Nursing Academic Leadership Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostCanadian Association of Schools of Nursingen_US
dc.conference.locationToronto, Ontario, Canadaen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Nursing Academic Leadership in Action; Strategies for Success, 8 - 11 May, 2008. Held at the Hilton Downtown, Toronto.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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