Take the Lead: Utilizing Transformational Leadership Principles to Improve Results

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162353
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Take the Lead: Utilizing Transformational Leadership Principles to Improve Results
Abstract:
Take the Lead: Utilizing Transformational Leadership Principles to Improve Results
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2010
Author:Weimer, John, RN, BSN, NE-BC
P.I. Institution Name:Kettering Medical Center
Title:Clinical Nurse Manager of the Emergency
Department
Contact Address:3535 Southern Blvd., Kettering, OH, 45429, USA
Co-Authors:Pamela Lamb, RN, BSN, CEN; Dott Harris, RN, BSN, MHA, NEA-BC
Leadership Conference - Evidence-Based Practice Abstract: Take the Lead: Utilizing Transformational Leadership Principles to Improve Results

Purpose: In early 2008, a new Emergency Department(ED) leadership team was established that included the Director of Nursing, Nurse Manager, and Nurse Educator (all new to the organization but experienced to their roles). The team encountered a thirty percent RN vacancy rate, high agency use, patient satisfaction < 20th percentile, high reroute hours, absence of certified nurses, low employee satisfaction with leadership and significant core measure variances. This team dedicated their efforts to transition from transactional leadership principles (give/take relationship) to transformational leadership principles (based on moral rewards: both leader and follower elevated to a new plane of knowledge/skills). One question guided the teamÆs efforts: ôDoes transformational leadership serve as a catalyst for improvements?ö

Design: A retrospective 15 month review of key outcome areas and leadership strategies

Setting: A 450-bed, Magnet-designated, suburban teaching medical center located in the Midwest with a 47 bed ED averaging 46,000 visits per year

Participants: Emergency department staff and patients responding to satisfaction or opinion surveys 2007- 2009

Methods: The ED leadership team embraced J. M. BurnsÆ transformational paradigm: transactional leadership involves exchange of ideas between leader and follower; transformational leadership involves focused activities that raise both leader and follower to a higher level of knowledge or skill. Individualized consideration, intellectual stimulation, inspirational motivation, and idealized influence, which are the characteristics of transformational leadership, were correlated with specific metrics and accompanying strategies to improve ED outcomes. Key metrics included: Agency use/RN vacancy rate, number of certified staff, patient satisfaction scores, opportunities for improvement specific to core measures, ED diversion hours/reroute hours, and employee satisfaction. Specific improvement strategies were implemented and included: shared governance implementation, staff driven scheduling, clearly-defined mission and vision, employee-centered on-boarding and re-boarding of high performers, communication hallway, CEN review program, ENA orientation modules, yearly education calendar, team photos, star searches, avoiding triangulation/lateral hostility education, and positive praise.

Results/Outcomes: As of July 2009, employee satisfaction has increased significantly, 35% of RN staff have sat for a national board certification. Nine nurses are certified (CEN). Agency use is 0%. RN vacancy rate is 0%. Reroute hours have decreased by 70%. Core measures variances have decreased by 80%. Patient satisfaction scores are between the 70-94th percentiles. Currently there is a waiting list of nurses to practice in the ED.

Implications: Utilizing Transformational Leadership characteristics can serve as guideposts for developing strategies to improve key outcomes in an ED. Identifying additional metrics and improvement strategies is an ongoing process and assists in the evaluation emergency department leadership effectiveness.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTake the Lead: Utilizing Transformational Leadership Principles to Improve Resultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162353-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Take the Lead: Utilizing Transformational Leadership Principles to Improve Results</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Weimer, John, RN, BSN, NE-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Kettering Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Nurse Manager of the Emergency<br/>Department<br/></td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">3535 Southern Blvd., Kettering, OH, 45429, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">John.Weimer@khnetwork.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Pamela Lamb, RN, BSN, CEN; Dott Harris, RN, BSN, MHA, NEA-BC</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Leadership Conference - Evidence-Based Practice Abstract: Take the Lead: Utilizing Transformational Leadership Principles to Improve Results<br/><br/>Purpose: In early 2008, a new Emergency Department(ED) leadership team was established that included the Director of Nursing, Nurse Manager, and Nurse Educator (all new to the organization but experienced to their roles). The team encountered a thirty percent RN vacancy rate, high agency use, patient satisfaction &lt; 20th percentile, high reroute hours, absence of certified nurses, low employee satisfaction with leadership and significant core measure variances. This team dedicated their efforts to transition from transactional leadership principles (give/take relationship) to transformational leadership principles (based on moral rewards: both leader and follower elevated to a new plane of knowledge/skills). One question guided the team&AElig;s efforts: &ocirc;Does transformational leadership serve as a catalyst for improvements?&ouml;<br/><br/>Design: A retrospective 15 month review of key outcome areas and leadership strategies<br/><br/>Setting: A 450-bed, Magnet-designated, suburban teaching medical center located in the Midwest with a 47 bed ED averaging 46,000 visits per year<br/><br/>Participants: Emergency department staff and patients responding to satisfaction or opinion surveys 2007- 2009<br/><br/>Methods: The ED leadership team embraced J. M. Burns&AElig; transformational paradigm: transactional leadership involves exchange of ideas between leader and follower; transformational leadership involves focused activities that raise both leader and follower to a higher level of knowledge or skill. Individualized consideration, intellectual stimulation, inspirational motivation, and idealized influence, which are the characteristics of transformational leadership, were correlated with specific metrics and accompanying strategies to improve ED outcomes. Key metrics included: Agency use/RN vacancy rate, number of certified staff, patient satisfaction scores, opportunities for improvement specific to core measures, ED diversion hours/reroute hours, and employee satisfaction. Specific improvement strategies were implemented and included: shared governance implementation, staff driven scheduling, clearly-defined mission and vision, employee-centered on-boarding and re-boarding of high performers, communication hallway, CEN review program, ENA orientation modules, yearly education calendar, team photos, star searches, avoiding triangulation/lateral hostility education, and positive praise.<br/><br/>Results/Outcomes: As of July 2009, employee satisfaction has increased significantly, 35% of RN staff have sat for a national board certification. Nine nurses are certified (CEN). Agency use is 0%. RN vacancy rate is 0%. Reroute hours have decreased by 70%. Core measures variances have decreased by 80%. Patient satisfaction scores are between the 70-94th percentiles. Currently there is a waiting list of nurses to practice in the ED.<br/><br/>Implications: Utilizing Transformational Leadership characteristics can serve as guideposts for developing strategies to improve key outcomes in an ED. Identifying additional metrics and improvement strategies is an ongoing process and assists in the evaluation emergency department leadership effectiveness.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:26:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:26:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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