9.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162360
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Whose Job is it Anyway? Disruptive Behavior and Lateral VIolence.
Abstract:
Whose Job is it Anyway? Disruptive Behavior and Lateral VIolence.
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2010
Author:Anderson, Monica L., RN, BSN, CEN
P.I. Institution Name:Mercy Medical Center
Title:Clinical Nurse III
Contact Address:7761 Sandstone Court, Ellicott City, MD, 21043, USA
Contact Telephone:410-332-9477
Co-Authors:Teresa Kostelec, RN, BSN, CEN
[ENA Annual Conference - Research Presentation]
Purpose: Lateral violence (LV) is defined as any inappropriate behavior, confrontation, or conflict ranging from verbal to physical harassment. The prevalence of inappropriate and unprofessional behaviors in the Emergency Department (ED) has had a negative impact on job satisfaction, turnover rates and patient care delivery. The aim of the project is to answer the research question: Does a comprehensive educational and experiential intervention addressing role expectations and professional behavior decrease incidence of lateral violence, improve job satisfaction and decrease turnover rate among health care providers in an urban community emergency department?

Design: a quasi-experimental pre/post intervention design was used to assess change in incidence of lateral violence, job satisfaction and turnover rates among health care providers following completion of variety educational and experiential interventions.

Setting: Trauma Level II, urban, community, teaching hospital.

Participants: A convenience sample of emergency department staff.

Methods: The intervention phase consisted of two phases. Phase I: "Think Tank" sessions held with emergency department staff and department manager to assess perceived role expectations and barriers and facilitators to role performance. Phase II: All emergency department staff were encouraged to attend educational/experiential sessions that included didactic information on job roles and expectations as well as role play and problem solving activities focusing on the concept of lateral violence within the work place.

Using a scannable form, emergency department staff will complete a pre/post intervention survey assessing job satisfaction and perceptions regarding lateral violence in the work place. The pre-intervention survey was completed prior to participation in Phase II of the intervention. The post-intervention survey will be distributed after the completion of phase II interventions (Estimated time of completion June 2010).

From the pre-survey; each job satisfaction item was analyzed using paired t-tests to compare the mean scores of the measured variable from the pre-test to post-test. Variables measuring types and incidence of lateral violence pre and post intervention will be analyzed using appropriate inferential statistics (Chi-square, t-tests). Responses to open-ended questions are analyzed for recurrent themes and concerns.

Results: 114 pre-intervention surveys were mailed with 32 responses. Results indicated sarcasm, eye rolling/sighs, and gossip behaviors were the most prevalent LV behaviors in the unit. Particularly interesting was the lack of participation from nursing support staff in returning the survey and the identification of the nursing support staff as most likely to demonstrate lateral violence behaviors. Write in comments identified the sporadic use of LV by the unit's leadership. Seventy-five percent of respondents reported LV has impeded patient care delivery and one third have considered seeking other employment as a result of LV on the unit.

Phase II is not completed. Post intervention survey results are not yet available.

Implications: Lateral violence is an identified problem in our emergency department and throughout the institution. Literature search revealed no specific effective intervention or a comprehensive survey tool available. Lateral violence has significant impact on patient care and new nurse satisfaction and turnover.

Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWhose Job is it Anyway? Disruptive Behavior and Lateral VIolence.en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162360-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Whose Job is it Anyway? Disruptive Behavior and Lateral VIolence.</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Anderson, Monica L., RN, BSN, CEN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Mercy Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Nurse III</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">7761 Sandstone Court, Ellicott City, MD, 21043, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">410-332-9477</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">manderso@mdmercy.com; monicarn@comcast.net</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Teresa Kostelec, RN, BSN, CEN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[ENA Annual Conference - Research Presentation] <br/>Purpose: Lateral violence (LV) is defined as any inappropriate behavior, confrontation, or conflict ranging from verbal to physical harassment. The prevalence of inappropriate and unprofessional behaviors in the Emergency Department (ED) has had a negative impact on job satisfaction, turnover rates and patient care delivery. The aim of the project is to answer the research question: Does a comprehensive educational and experiential intervention addressing role expectations and professional behavior decrease incidence of lateral violence, improve job satisfaction and decrease turnover rate among health care providers in an urban community emergency department?<br/><br/>Design: a quasi-experimental pre/post intervention design was used to assess change in incidence of lateral violence, job satisfaction and turnover rates among health care providers following completion of variety educational and experiential interventions.<br/><br/>Setting: Trauma Level II, urban, community, teaching hospital.<br/><br/>Participants: A convenience sample of emergency department staff.<br/><br/>Methods: The intervention phase consisted of two phases. Phase I: &quot;Think Tank&quot; sessions held with emergency department staff and department manager to assess perceived role expectations and barriers and facilitators to role performance. Phase II: All emergency department staff were encouraged to attend educational/experiential sessions that included didactic information on job roles and expectations as well as role play and problem solving activities focusing on the concept of lateral violence within the work place.<br/><br/>Using a scannable form, emergency department staff will complete a pre/post intervention survey assessing job satisfaction and perceptions regarding lateral violence in the work place. The pre-intervention survey was completed prior to participation in Phase II of the intervention. The post-intervention survey will be distributed after the completion of phase II interventions (Estimated time of completion June 2010).<br/><br/>From the pre-survey; each job satisfaction item was analyzed using paired t-tests to compare the mean scores of the measured variable from the pre-test to post-test. Variables measuring types and incidence of lateral violence pre and post intervention will be analyzed using appropriate inferential statistics (Chi-square, t-tests). Responses to open-ended questions are analyzed for recurrent themes and concerns.<br/><br/>Results: 114 pre-intervention surveys were mailed with 32 responses. Results indicated sarcasm, eye rolling/sighs, and gossip behaviors were the most prevalent LV behaviors in the unit. Particularly interesting was the lack of participation from nursing support staff in returning the survey and the identification of the nursing support staff as most likely to demonstrate lateral violence behaviors. Write in comments identified the sporadic use of LV by the unit's leadership. Seventy-five percent of respondents reported LV has impeded patient care delivery and one third have considered seeking other employment as a result of LV on the unit.<br/><br/>Phase II is not completed. Post intervention survey results are not yet available.<br/><br/>Implications: Lateral violence is an identified problem in our emergency department and throughout the institution. Literature search revealed no specific effective intervention or a comprehensive survey tool available. Lateral violence has significant impact on patient care and new nurse satisfaction and turnover. <br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:26:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:26:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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