2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162372
Type:
Presentation
Title:
How do Temporal Artery Thermometers Measure Up?
Abstract:
How do Temporal Artery Thermometers Measure Up?
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2010
Author:Carrigan, Julie, RN, BSN, CEN
P.I. Institution Name:Catawba Valley Medical Center
Title:Patient Care Coordinator
Contact Address:810 Fairgrove Church Road, Hickory, NC, 28602, USA
Contact Telephone:828-326-2097
Co-Authors:David Solomon, RN, BSN, CEN, EMT-P; Ann Moore, RN-BC, MSC, CEN
[ENA Annual Conference - Research Presentation]
Purpose: According to the American College of Emergency Physicians, febrile patients account for 20% of pediatric emergency department (ED) visits. Rectal temperatures are the gold standard for core temperature measurement in young children, and accurate temperature values are essential in emergent setting assessment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate rectal and temporal artery (TA) temperature values for agreement within +/- 0.5o Fahrenheit to determine whether the less invasive TA thermometry is appropriate for use in children in the ED.

Design: A prospective, matched pair study design was employed, i.e. control (rectal) and experimental (TA) temperature data were obtained from the same subject.

Setting: Conducted in a Magnet, community hospital in the Southeastern US, the facilityÆs ED registered 52,868 visits in 2009.

Participants/Subjects: Children over 90 days and < 5 years old, presenting to the ED with non-life threatening conditions, were eligible for enrollment. Exclusion criteria included EMS arrival, triage directly to treatment area, presence of facial injury, temporal area malformation, rectal anomalies, and mental challenges. The research study received IRB approval, and the pediatric subjectÆs parent/guardian provided written informed consent. Power analysis (alpha=0.5; beta=95%) was utilized to determine the sample population.

Methods: For all subjects, the control temperature was measured first immediately followed by the TA temperature measurement. Data collectors completed temporal artery thermometer training and demonstrated competency to ensure interrater reliability. Rectal thermometry proficiency was previously established. Dependent variables were subject age and presenting condition (illness or injury). Potential confounding variables that could influence measurements include unpredictable movement during rectal thermometer placement, and forehead diaphoresis in TA measurement. Statistical analysis included the calculation of mean, standard deviation, variance, t-statistic (t-test paired two-sample for means), and two-tailed p value (95% confidence)

Results/Outcomes: The sample population (N=185) was predominantly male (56%). The majority of subjects were Caucasian, African American or Hispanic. The mean rectal temperature of the sample population was 100.48 oF + 1.76 oF, while the mean TA temperature was 99.64 oF + 1.41 oF. In evaluating this difference, t-test analysis revealed the control and experimental temperatures were significantly different (p<0.00001). Subjects were categorized by age: 91days-1yr (n=55), >1yr-2yr (n=80), >2yr-3yr (n=42), >3yr-4yr (n=8). Inferential analysis, by age category, showed significant differences existed between rectal and TA temperatures for all categories except >3yr-4yr subjects (p=0.1996). However, the small number of subjects enrolled to date in this category is a caveat. Although 87.6% of all subjects presented with illness, presenting condition was of no consequence. Upon enrollment of the total sample population (N=235; determined by power analysis), data analysis will be repeated.

Implications: These findings stand in contrast to published reports in which substantial differences in rectal and temporal artery thermometry values were not found. Conversely, these results support published findings showing a significant variation between the two means of temperature measurement. The final results will be presented to ED physicians at the facility to determine if a practice change is warranted at all or in children of certain ages.



Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHow do Temporal Artery Thermometers Measure Up?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162372-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">How do Temporal Artery Thermometers Measure Up?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Carrigan, Julie, RN, BSN, CEN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Catawba Valley Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Patient Care Coordinator</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">810 Fairgrove Church Road, Hickory, NC, 28602, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">828-326-2097</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jdcarrigan@catawbavalleymc.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">David Solomon, RN, BSN, CEN, EMT-P; Ann Moore, RN-BC, MSC, CEN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[ENA Annual Conference - Research Presentation] <br/>Purpose: According to the American College of Emergency Physicians, febrile patients account for 20% of pediatric emergency department (ED) visits. Rectal temperatures are the gold standard for core temperature measurement in young children, and accurate temperature values are essential in emergent setting assessment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate rectal and temporal artery (TA) temperature values for agreement within +/- 0.5o Fahrenheit to determine whether the less invasive TA thermometry is appropriate for use in children in the ED.<br/><br/> Design: A prospective, matched pair study design was employed, i.e. control (rectal) and experimental (TA) temperature data were obtained from the same subject. <br/><br/>Setting: Conducted in a Magnet, community hospital in the Southeastern US, the facility&AElig;s ED registered 52,868 visits in 2009.<br/><br/>Participants/Subjects: Children over 90 days and &lt; 5 years old, presenting to the ED with non-life threatening conditions, were eligible for enrollment. Exclusion criteria included EMS arrival, triage directly to treatment area, presence of facial injury, temporal area malformation, rectal anomalies, and mental challenges. The research study received IRB approval, and the pediatric subject&AElig;s parent/guardian provided written informed consent. Power analysis (alpha=0.5; beta=95%) was utilized to determine the sample population.<br/> <br/> Methods: For all subjects, the control temperature was measured first immediately followed by the TA temperature measurement. Data collectors completed temporal artery thermometer training and demonstrated competency to ensure interrater reliability. Rectal thermometry proficiency was previously established. Dependent variables were subject age and presenting condition (illness or injury). Potential confounding variables that could influence measurements include unpredictable movement during rectal thermometer placement, and forehead diaphoresis in TA measurement. Statistical analysis included the calculation of mean, standard deviation, variance, t-statistic (t-test paired two-sample for means), and two-tailed p value (95% confidence)<br/> <br/>Results/Outcomes: The sample population (N=185) was predominantly male (56%). The majority of subjects were Caucasian, African American or Hispanic. The mean rectal temperature of the sample population was 100.48 oF + 1.76 oF, while the mean TA temperature was 99.64 oF + 1.41 oF. In evaluating this difference, t-test analysis revealed the control and experimental temperatures were significantly different (p&lt;0.00001). Subjects were categorized by age: 91days-1yr (n=55), &gt;1yr-2yr (n=80), &gt;2yr-3yr (n=42), &gt;3yr-4yr (n=8). Inferential analysis, by age category, showed significant differences existed between rectal and TA temperatures for all categories except &gt;3yr-4yr subjects (p=0.1996). However, the small number of subjects enrolled to date in this category is a caveat. Although 87.6% of all subjects presented with illness, presenting condition was of no consequence. Upon enrollment of the total sample population (N=235; determined by power analysis), data analysis will be repeated.<br/><br/>Implications: These findings stand in contrast to published reports in which substantial differences in rectal and temporal artery thermometry values were not found. Conversely, these results support published findings showing a significant variation between the two means of temperature measurement. The final results will be presented to ED physicians at the facility to determine if a practice change is warranted at all or in children of certain ages.<br/><br/> <br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:27:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:27:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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