2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162381
Type:
Presentation
Title:
No Bones About It: The Pediatric Emergency Department Has Gone To The Dogs
Abstract:
No Bones About It: The Pediatric Emergency Department Has Gone To The Dogs
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2010
Author:Goeddeke, Vicky, MS, RN, CEN, CPEN
P.I. Institution Name:Northwest Community Hospital
Title:Magnet Recognition Program & Nursing Excellence Manager
Contact Address:800 W. Central Road, Arlington Heights, IL, 60005, USA
Contact Telephone:847-618-7987
Co-Authors:Sue Pritscher, BSN, RN, CEN
[ENA Annual Conference - Evidence-based Practice Presentation]

Purpose: In 1859 Florence Nightingale recognized the impact of animals on health when she wrote ôa small pet animal is often an excellent companion for the sickö. Research confirms animal interaction can impact both physical and psychological aspects of the patientÆs status. Typically available in stable environments offered by in-patient units, AAT has been offered in what would be considered alternative settings. However, the how-to manual of making AAT available in non-traditional areas is still being written. It was believed that AAT in the Pediatric ED setting would enhance both patient care and patient satisfaction.

Design: Animal assisted therapy (AAT) is an intervention undergoing rapid growth of implementation in many healthcare organizations. These programs typically are directed to inpatient units due to the more controlled environment offered in these settings. Early success with our AAT program at the organization led to development of guidelines that would bring the program to the Pediatric ED in fall 2008. Overcoming challenges of offering this service in the Pediatric ED setting can recognize benefits for both patients and staff.

Setting: The animal assisted therapy program described above was implemented in a community based hospital located in the suburbs of a metropolitan area. The organization offers a defined Pediatric ED area within its emergency services arena. The organization sees 75,000 ED visits annually.

Participants/Subjects: The AAT program is offered to any pediatric patient in the department at the time of the scheduled animal visits.

Methods: Animal visits are nurse driven; the Charge Nurse evaluates patients and parental consent obtained. Patients may be excluded for criteria but can still see dogs through a closed glass door. Patients/families are prepared for the visit through a hand-out of program guidelines. Dog and handler teams call department prior to standard visit times and receive approved patient list from Charge Nurse. Handlers carry germicidal hand solution for hygiene intervention between patient visits û used by all visit participants. Charge Nurse cancels or stops visits if indicated by critical patient issues within the department.

Results/Outcomes: The first year of the AAT program in this alternate setting has proven extremely successful. Responses for parent/patient post visit surveys reflect very high satisfaction with the program which resulted in frequency of visit times being increased. Staff examples reflect decreased anxiety in patients and increased compliance with medical requests when animals are visiting. Staff report enjoying dog visits either with patients or at nursesÆ station, as workload allows.

Implications: The success of AAT visitation in the Pediatric ED setting is reflected by patient satisfaction scores. As the organization's AAT program grows, we plan for again increasing frequency of visit times in Pediatric ED as well as expanding the program to include visits in Main ED setting. Potential for a formal research project to investigate visit impact of dogs in a Pediatric ED setting is being reviewed.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNo Bones About It: The Pediatric Emergency Department Has Gone To The Dogsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162381-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">No Bones About It: The Pediatric Emergency Department Has Gone To The Dogs</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Goeddeke, Vicky, MS, RN, CEN, CPEN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Northwest Community Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Magnet Recognition Program &amp; Nursing Excellence Manager</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">800 W. Central Road, Arlington Heights, IL, 60005, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">847-618-7987</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">vgoeddek@nch.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Sue Pritscher, BSN, RN, CEN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[ENA Annual Conference - Evidence-based Practice Presentation] <br/><br/>Purpose: In 1859 Florence Nightingale recognized the impact of animals on health when she wrote &ocirc;a small pet animal is often an excellent companion for the sick&ouml;. Research confirms animal interaction can impact both physical and psychological aspects of the patient&AElig;s status. Typically available in stable environments offered by in-patient units, AAT has been offered in what would be considered alternative settings. However, the how-to manual of making AAT available in non-traditional areas is still being written. It was believed that AAT in the Pediatric ED setting would enhance both patient care and patient satisfaction.<br/><br/>Design: Animal assisted therapy (AAT) is an intervention undergoing rapid growth of implementation in many healthcare organizations. These programs typically are directed to inpatient units due to the more controlled environment offered in these settings. Early success with our AAT program at the organization led to development of guidelines that would bring the program to the Pediatric ED in fall 2008. Overcoming challenges of offering this service in the Pediatric ED setting can recognize benefits for both patients and staff. <br/><br/>Setting: The animal assisted therapy program described above was implemented in a community based hospital located in the suburbs of a metropolitan area. The organization offers a defined Pediatric ED area within its emergency services arena. The organization sees 75,000 ED visits annually. <br/><br/>Participants/Subjects: The AAT program is offered to any pediatric patient in the department at the time of the scheduled animal visits.<br/><br/>Methods: Animal visits are nurse driven; the Charge Nurse evaluates patients and parental consent obtained. Patients may be excluded for criteria but can still see dogs through a closed glass door. Patients/families are prepared for the visit through a hand-out of program guidelines. Dog and handler teams call department prior to standard visit times and receive approved patient list from Charge Nurse. Handlers carry germicidal hand solution for hygiene intervention between patient visits &ucirc; used by all visit participants. Charge Nurse cancels or stops visits if indicated by critical patient issues within the department. <br/><br/>Results/Outcomes: The first year of the AAT program in this alternate setting has proven extremely successful. Responses for parent/patient post visit surveys reflect very high satisfaction with the program which resulted in frequency of visit times being increased. Staff examples reflect decreased anxiety in patients and increased compliance with medical requests when animals are visiting. Staff report enjoying dog visits either with patients or at nurses&AElig; station, as workload allows.<br/><br/>Implications: The success of AAT visitation in the Pediatric ED setting is reflected by patient satisfaction scores. As the organization's AAT program grows, we plan for again increasing frequency of visit times in Pediatric ED as well as expanding the program to include visits in Main ED setting. Potential for a formal research project to investigate visit impact of dogs in a Pediatric ED setting is being reviewed.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:27:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:27:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.