2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162386
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Mock Trauma Codes: Valuable Education
Abstract:
Mock Trauma Codes: Valuable Education
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2010
Author:Lazenby, Merri, RN, BSN,CCRN, CEN
P.I. Institution Name:Delnor Community Hospital
Title:Trauma and Violence Registrar/ED Staff Nurse
Contact Address:300 Randall Road, Geneva, IL, 60134, USA
Contact Telephone:630-208-3092, X3
[ENA Annual Conference - Research Presentation]

Purpose: Utilization of mock codes in cardiac arrest scenarios has been shown to improve the knowledge of staff nurses in prior studies; however, little to no research has been done on the trauma mock code's effectiveness as an educational tool for nurses. The primary aim of this study is to see if utilization of a mock trauma code educational initiative changes nurses' self-reported level of confidence, knowledge, and comfort in managing trauma.

Design: Pre- and post-test design

Setting: This study was completed in a 118-bed community mid-western Level II trauma center.

Participants/subjects: Nurses who respond to trauma codes (including emergency and critical care nurses and members of the rapid response team (RRT) voluntarily participated in the mock code teaching session. IRB approval was granted and all participants completed an informed consent process.

Methods: A one-hour educational session consisted of a 15 minute mock trauma code, debriefing and teaching intervention, and a new post-intervention mock trauma code. Before and after each session participants completed pre- and post-intervention questionnaires that included basic demographic questions as well as six study questions replicated from Dr. Mikrogianakis' study. They focused specifically on self reported comfort, confidence, and familiarity with trauma care and trauma response. Responses were Likert scaled from 1 to 7 (with one representing low and seven representing high).

Results/Outcomes: Thirty three pre-questionnaire and post-questionnaire pairs were completed. Nurses reported a significant improvement in their (1) comfort in managing trauma (mean pre 4.21 +/- 1.76, post 5.48 +/- 1.20, p < 0.001); (2) understating of their role within the trauma team (mean pre 4.64 +/- 1.71, mean post 5.88 +/- 0.89, p < 0.001); (3) familiarity with the resuscitation room (mean pre 4.00 +/- 2.10, mean post 5.52 +/- 1.15, p > 0.001); (4) ability to find equipment (mean pre 3.68 +/- 2.09, mean post 5.52 +/- 1.06, p < 0.001); (5) comfort in procedural skills required during a trauma (mean pre 4.58 +/- 1.71, mean post 5.94 +/- 0.03, p < 0.001); (6) awareness of assessment /management priorities of a trauma resuscitation (mean pre 4.76 +/- 1.71, mean post 6.09 +/- 0.69, p < 0.001). For all questions, there was a significant difference (p value of at most 0.03) indicating that the intervention was significantly more helpful for nurses with less than five years of trauma experience. The less time a nurse has spent practicing trauma nursing, the more helpful the training was, regardless of their previous formal trauma education or total professional tenure.

Implications: In an environment of "lean" practices and "doing more with less" in healthcare we find that education dollars for nurses are stretched thinner and thinner. Utilizing mock trauma codes to educate nursing staff, especially inexperienced staff new to the emergency department and/or trauma team are an effective educational tool that increases self reported confidence, knowledge, and comfort in caring for complex trauma patients. One nurse educator, one hour, many nurses hungry for useful evidence based education - the educational possibilities are endless!
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMock Trauma Codes: Valuable Educationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162386-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Mock Trauma Codes: Valuable Education<br/></td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lazenby, Merri, RN, BSN,CCRN, CEN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Delnor Community Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Trauma and Violence Registrar/ED Staff Nurse</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">300 Randall Road, Geneva, IL, 60134, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">630-208-3092, X3</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">merri.lazenby@delnor.com; rnflygirl@gmail.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[ENA Annual Conference - Research Presentation] <br/><br/>Purpose: Utilization of mock codes in cardiac arrest scenarios has been shown to improve the knowledge of staff nurses in prior studies; however, little to no research has been done on the trauma mock code's effectiveness as an educational tool for nurses. The primary aim of this study is to see if utilization of a mock trauma code educational initiative changes nurses' self-reported level of confidence, knowledge, and comfort in managing trauma.<br/><br/>Design: Pre- and post-test design<br/><br/>Setting: This study was completed in a 118-bed community mid-western Level II trauma center.<br/><br/>Participants/subjects: Nurses who respond to trauma codes (including emergency and critical care nurses and members of the rapid response team (RRT) voluntarily participated in the mock code teaching session. IRB approval was granted and all participants completed an informed consent process.<br/><br/>Methods: A one-hour educational session consisted of a 15 minute mock trauma code, debriefing and teaching intervention, and a new post-intervention mock trauma code. Before and after each session participants completed pre- and post-intervention questionnaires that included basic demographic questions as well as six study questions replicated from Dr. Mikrogianakis' study. They focused specifically on self reported comfort, confidence, and familiarity with trauma care and trauma response. Responses were Likert scaled from 1 to 7 (with one representing low and seven representing high).<br/><br/>Results/Outcomes: Thirty three pre-questionnaire and post-questionnaire pairs were completed. Nurses reported a significant improvement in their (1) comfort in managing trauma (mean pre 4.21 +/- 1.76, post 5.48 +/- 1.20, p &lt; 0.001); (2) understating of their role within the trauma team (mean pre 4.64 +/- 1.71, mean post 5.88 +/- 0.89, p &lt; 0.001); (3) familiarity with the resuscitation room (mean pre 4.00 +/- 2.10, mean post 5.52 +/- 1.15, p &gt; 0.001); (4) ability to find equipment (mean pre 3.68 +/- 2.09, mean post 5.52 +/- 1.06, p &lt; 0.001); (5) comfort in procedural skills required during a trauma (mean pre 4.58 +/- 1.71, mean post 5.94 +/- 0.03, p &lt; 0.001); (6) awareness of assessment /management priorities of a trauma resuscitation (mean pre 4.76 +/- 1.71, mean post 6.09 +/- 0.69, p &lt; 0.001). For all questions, there was a significant difference (p value of at most 0.03) indicating that the intervention was significantly more helpful for nurses with less than five years of trauma experience. The less time a nurse has spent practicing trauma nursing, the more helpful the training was, regardless of their previous formal trauma education or total professional tenure.<br/><br/>Implications: In an environment of &quot;lean&quot; practices and &quot;doing more with less&quot; in healthcare we find that education dollars for nurses are stretched thinner and thinner. Utilizing mock trauma codes to educate nursing staff, especially inexperienced staff new to the emergency department and/or trauma team are an effective educational tool that increases self reported confidence, knowledge, and comfort in caring for complex trauma patients. One nurse educator, one hour, many nurses hungry for useful evidence based education - the educational possibilities are endless!<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:27:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:27:19Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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