2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162387
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Patient Simulation: An Innovative Way for Trauma Nurse Training
Abstract:
Patient Simulation: An Innovative Way for Trauma Nurse Training
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2010
Author:Lockett, LaToya, RN, BSN, MBA/MHA
P.I. Institution Name:WakeMed (Adult Emergency Dept.)
Title:Clinical Educator/Supervisor
Contact Address:3000 New Bern Avenue, Raleigh, NC, 27610, USA
Contact Telephone:919-350-8710
[ENA Annual Conference - Evidence-based Practice Presentation]

Purpose: Working in a Level 1/high volume trauma center is challenging and at times intimidating for emergency department (ED) nurses. Discomfort and fear can be crippling. The incorporation of a trauma simulation as part of the trauma training is pivotal in increasing comfort and competence for the ED nurse. The program is designed to provide life-like scenarios that require real interventions to stabilize the simulated patient.

Setting: This ED is one of the busiest emergency departments in the state of North Carolina with an average of 140,000 patients a year. The ED provides services not only to members of the immediate community but access is expanded to the surrounding counties through referrals/transfers.
The training/teaching occurs in the hospitalÆs state-of-the art Medical Simulation Center. The center is a 3,800 square-foot facility that provides a unique training environment for health care providers. Participants have access to the video, audio, and all the information that was recorded during the scenario, including the treatments given and vital signs, for future reference.

Participants/Subjects: The participants include members of the trauma team: this includes the emergency room nurses in training, trauma techs, physicians, and the simulators that breathe, have pulses, bleed if cut, talk, respond appropriately to medications, and either die or survive.

Methods: The 10-hour class consists of a detailed breakdown of the trauma room, 5 hours of instructional information using PowerPoint and video, and 2 hours in the simulation lab with real life trauma related scenarios. Upon the completion of each scenario that is videotaped, a debriefing occurs. During debriefing the staff is given an opportunity to review the video and discuss the scenario; positive reinforcement and opportunities for improvement are shared. At the end of each class, the participants are asked to fill out an evaluation tool. This tool allows the participants to rate the class as excellent, good, fair, or poor in meeting all the objectives. They are also given the opportunity to rate the instructors, SIM Center/experience, and give comments.

Results/Outcomes: Thus far, there have been two trauma classes in the SIM Center. In the first group the nurses did not understand that they were required to feel for a pulse and listen to breath sounds. Learning from this experience, the 2nd class included a PowerPoint presentation that explained the functions of the simulators that had to be completed prior to attending the class. The participants also got a tour of the SIM Center prior to the actual simulation. This significantly improved the experience; the nurses enjoyed the experience. The evaluations and feedback are displayed in table format.

Implications: Since simulation provides a non-threatening environment and a great practice experience in taking care of a real trauma patient, it increases the chance to build confidence, comfort, and competence prior to entering the trauma room for the first time. Managers/Educators should consider simulation when training/teaching a new procedure, a new graduate nurse, or a new role such as working in the trauma room.

Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePatient Simulation: An Innovative Way for Trauma Nurse Trainingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162387-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Patient Simulation: An Innovative Way for Trauma Nurse Training</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lockett, LaToya, RN, BSN, MBA/MHA</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">WakeMed (Adult Emergency Dept.)</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Educator/Supervisor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">3000 New Bern Avenue, Raleigh, NC, 27610, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">919-350-8710</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">llockett@wakemed.org</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[ENA Annual Conference - Evidence-based Practice Presentation] <br/><br/>Purpose: Working in a Level 1/high volume trauma center is challenging and at times intimidating for emergency department (ED) nurses. Discomfort and fear can be crippling. The incorporation of a trauma simulation as part of the trauma training is pivotal in increasing comfort and competence for the ED nurse. The program is designed to provide life-like scenarios that require real interventions to stabilize the simulated patient. <br/><br/>Setting: This ED is one of the busiest emergency departments in the state of North Carolina with an average of 140,000 patients a year. The ED provides services not only to members of the immediate community but access is expanded to the surrounding counties through referrals/transfers. <br/>The training/teaching occurs in the hospital&AElig;s state-of-the art Medical Simulation Center. The center is a 3,800 square-foot facility that provides a unique training environment for health care providers. Participants have access to the video, audio, and all the information that was recorded during the scenario, including the treatments given and vital signs, for future reference. <br/><br/>Participants/Subjects: The participants include members of the trauma team: this includes the emergency room nurses in training, trauma techs, physicians, and the simulators that breathe, have pulses, bleed if cut, talk, respond appropriately to medications, and either die or survive.<br/><br/>Methods: The 10-hour class consists of a detailed breakdown of the trauma room, 5 hours of instructional information using PowerPoint and video, and 2 hours in the simulation lab with real life trauma related scenarios. Upon the completion of each scenario that is videotaped, a debriefing occurs. During debriefing the staff is given an opportunity to review the video and discuss the scenario; positive reinforcement and opportunities for improvement are shared. At the end of each class, the participants are asked to fill out an evaluation tool. This tool allows the participants to rate the class as excellent, good, fair, or poor in meeting all the objectives. They are also given the opportunity to rate the instructors, SIM Center/experience, and give comments. <br/><br/>Results/Outcomes: Thus far, there have been two trauma classes in the SIM Center. In the first group the nurses did not understand that they were required to feel for a pulse and listen to breath sounds. Learning from this experience, the 2nd class included a PowerPoint presentation that explained the functions of the simulators that had to be completed prior to attending the class. The participants also got a tour of the SIM Center prior to the actual simulation. This significantly improved the experience; the nurses enjoyed the experience. The evaluations and feedback are displayed in table format. <br/><br/>Implications: Since simulation provides a non-threatening environment and a great practice experience in taking care of a real trauma patient, it increases the chance to build confidence, comfort, and competence prior to entering the trauma room for the first time. Managers/Educators should consider simulation when training/teaching a new procedure, a new graduate nurse, or a new role such as working in the trauma room.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:27:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:27:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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