2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162411
Type:
Presentation
Title:
To Sneeze or Not to Sneeze, Influenza Specimen Collection Methods
Abstract:
To Sneeze or Not to Sneeze, Influenza Specimen Collection Methods
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2010
Author:Summers, Geraldine J., RN, CEN
P.I. Institution Name:Greater Baltimore Medical Center
Title:RN
Contact Address:6701 N. Charles Street, Towson, MD, 21204, USA
Contact Telephone:443-849-2226
Co-Authors:Susan Gray, RN, BS, CEN; Wai-Kwung Lau, RN, BSN, CEN; Paula Terzigni, RN, CEN, BSN, MBA
[ENA Annual Conference - Evidence-based Practice Presentation]

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify learning needs regarding correct technique for Influenza specimen collection. Literature review and review of current hospital procedures were done to identify the scientific methodology required to obtain an accurate result and to ensure proper staff precautions to minimize risk of exposure.

Design: This was an evidence based practice study requiring Institution Review Board approval and Informed consent from the study participants. Key staff members were trained in two methods of collection techniques, lab results was then obtained to verify the accuracy of the collection techniques.

Setting: This study was done in a suburban Emergency Department.

Participants/Subjects: Participants were adults who presented with fever, malaise and generalized upper respiratory complaints. Constraints regarding laboratory availability were factored in to the study. Due to laboratory staffing, double tests could only be run Monday through Friday from the hours of 7:00AM to 3:00 PM.

Method: The protocol for collection of the two specimens is as follows: upon receiving the physicians order to obtain and Influenza specimen, informed consent was received from the study participant. Test specimen "A" was collected by instilling 3 to 5 milliliters of normal saline solution into the participant nare. The participant was then instructed to forcefully discharge nasal contents into a sterile specimen collection cup. Specimen "B" was collected 5 minutes later. The collection method required the use of the DeLee 10 French suction catheter kit, wall suction at 80 cms. and normal saline. The procedure for suctioning requires that the nurse garb in gown, mask and goggles to prevent splashes from occurring. The participant was then instructed to tilt their head backwards, again 3-5 milliliters of normal saline was instilled into the patient nare. The catheter tip was the inserted through the nare to the nasopharynx without suction. After reaching the nasopharynx, suction was applied as the catheter tip was withdrawn with subsequent fluid discharged directly into the specimen collection trap. Both specimens were sent to the laboratory to verify accuracy of results. Patients were questioned as to the discomfort level of either procedure and no patients complained of any discomfort.

Results/Outcomes: Laboratory studies were reviewed and it was found that there were no discrepancies in the results. However, it was quickly observed that the risk of contamination to the staff had a higher potential based on the current procedure regarding masks and goggles during suctioning. It was also observed that there was no risk of contamination from the specimen trap when utilizing the DeLee kit because it is an enclosed unit. Further discussion among the staff revealed the concern regarding the possibility of contamination when utilizing the nasal discharge/ sterile cup method.

Implications: As of this date, current procedure is being reviewed and will be updated to reflect the findings of this study. Additional staff has also been trained in the DeLee method as the preferred method of collection.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTo Sneeze or Not to Sneeze, Influenza Specimen Collection Methodsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162411-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">To Sneeze or Not to Sneeze, Influenza Specimen Collection Methods</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Summers, Geraldine J., RN, CEN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Greater Baltimore Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">RN</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">6701 N. Charles Street, Towson, MD, 21204, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">443-849-2226</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">witchwmnrn@hotmail.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Susan Gray, RN, BS, CEN; Wai-Kwung Lau, RN, BSN, CEN; Paula Terzigni, RN, CEN, BSN, MBA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[ENA Annual Conference - Evidence-based Practice Presentation] <br/><br/>Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify learning needs regarding correct technique for Influenza specimen collection. Literature review and review of current hospital procedures were done to identify the scientific methodology required to obtain an accurate result and to ensure proper staff precautions to minimize risk of exposure.<br/><br/>Design: This was an evidence based practice study requiring Institution Review Board approval and Informed consent from the study participants. Key staff members were trained in two methods of collection techniques, lab results was then obtained to verify the accuracy of the collection techniques. <br/><br/>Setting: This study was done in a suburban Emergency Department. <br/><br/>Participants/Subjects: Participants were adults who presented with fever, malaise and generalized upper respiratory complaints. Constraints regarding laboratory availability were factored in to the study. Due to laboratory staffing, double tests could only be run Monday through Friday from the hours of 7:00AM to 3:00 PM.<br/><br/>Method: The protocol for collection of the two specimens is as follows: upon receiving the physicians order to obtain and Influenza specimen, informed consent was received from the study participant. Test specimen &quot;A&quot; was collected by instilling 3 to 5 milliliters of normal saline solution into the participant nare. The participant was then instructed to forcefully discharge nasal contents into a sterile specimen collection cup. Specimen &quot;B&quot; was collected 5 minutes later. The collection method required the use of the DeLee 10 French suction catheter kit, wall suction at 80 cms. and normal saline. The procedure for suctioning requires that the nurse garb in gown, mask and goggles to prevent splashes from occurring. The participant was then instructed to tilt their head backwards, again 3-5 milliliters of normal saline was instilled into the patient nare. The catheter tip was the inserted through the nare to the nasopharynx without suction. After reaching the nasopharynx, suction was applied as the catheter tip was withdrawn with subsequent fluid discharged directly into the specimen collection trap. Both specimens were sent to the laboratory to verify accuracy of results. Patients were questioned as to the discomfort level of either procedure and no patients complained of any discomfort. <br/><br/>Results/Outcomes: Laboratory studies were reviewed and it was found that there were no discrepancies in the results. However, it was quickly observed that the risk of contamination to the staff had a higher potential based on the current procedure regarding masks and goggles during suctioning. It was also observed that there was no risk of contamination from the specimen trap when utilizing the DeLee kit because it is an enclosed unit. Further discussion among the staff revealed the concern regarding the possibility of contamination when utilizing the nasal discharge/ sterile cup method.<br/><br/>Implications: As of this date, current procedure is being reviewed and will be updated to reflect the findings of this study. Additional staff has also been trained in the DeLee method as the preferred method of collection.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:27:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:27:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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