2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162417
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The iPod Intervention for the Pediatric Patient in Pain
Abstract:
The iPod Intervention for the Pediatric Patient in Pain
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2010
Author:Young, Tiffany, RN, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:WakeMed Health and Hospitals, ATTN: Children's ED
Title:Clinical Educator/ Supervisor
Contact Address:3000 New Bern Avenue, Raleigh, NC, 27610, USA
Contact Telephone:919-350-2883
Co-Authors:Elizabeth Griffin, RN, BS
[ENA Annual Conference - Evidence-based Practice Presentation]

Purpose: Staff in a large Children's Emergency Department (CED) developed the iPod Intervention to provide responsive and innovative care for pediatric patients experiencing pain and distress. The objective of the project is to use music as distraction from painful procedures and anxiety in the pediatric population.

Design: Four staff guided the first month of the iPod Intervention: two child life specialists and two RNs. CED Child life specialists were largely responsible for implementing the iPod Intervention. However, all CED Staff were encouraged to refer patients who might benefit from music therapy. A log was designed to track the demographics of patients who used the intervention and also helped busy staff keep track of the equipment. Satisfaction with the intervention was evaluated using an investigator-designed 4 question survey which was available in both English and Spanish. The survey provided an opportunity for both patients (or their parents) and CED staff to provide feedback.

Setting: The Children's Emergency Department is a part of a teaching, urban level I trauma one center in a capital city of the southern United States. The Children's Emergency Department sees an average annual volume of 45,000, from newborn to 17 years of age.

Participants/Subjects: The iPod Intervention was piloted on 50 patients and their families over the course of a four week period. Patients with moderate to severe pain such as sickle cell crisis, a fracture or a migraine headache, and patients who underwent painful procedures such as an incision and drainage, a laceration repair, IV insertion, or lumbar puncture were targeted while the four staff who guided the project staffed.

Methods: 4 iPod Nano models of different colors were loaded with music for different age groups. The iPod Nano model was chosen because its video screen allowed for greater patient and parental control of the music chosen. Patients had the option of listening to the iPod with earphones or by using a docking station with speakers. Both patient and parental feedback were gathered using a 4 question survey for each iPod user in the pilot study.

Results/Outcomes: Eighty-six percent (n=50) of the patients and families in the pilot group reported that listening to music via the iPod was "helpful" or "very helpful" in reducing their pain and/or discomfort. The iPods not only provided a welcome distraction from the patient's pain, but also reduced distress and anxiety in parents. Thus, a secondary benefit of the iPod Intervention was improved customer service which was reflected in an increase in departmental scores for pain management and overall quality of care.

Implications: Because of the demonstrated success of this program, the iPod Intervention is believed to be an initiative that holds promise for every patient in every setting. Per Leora Kuttner, Ph.D, one of the foremost authorities on working with children in pain, "Musicàcan be a fine aid in shifting attention away from pain and onto a very pleasant alternative. Music needs to be included more often in the treatment and recovery process for children (Kuttner, 1996)."

Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe iPod Intervention for the Pediatric Patient in Painen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162417-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The iPod Intervention for the Pediatric Patient in Pain</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Young, Tiffany, RN, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">WakeMed Health and Hospitals, ATTN: Children's ED</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Educator/ Supervisor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">3000 New Bern Avenue, Raleigh, NC, 27610, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">919-350-2883</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">tiyoung@wakemed.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Elizabeth Griffin, RN, BS</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[ENA Annual Conference - Evidence-based Practice Presentation] <br/><br/>Purpose: Staff in a large Children's Emergency Department (CED) developed the iPod Intervention to provide responsive and innovative care for pediatric patients experiencing pain and distress. The objective of the project is to use music as distraction from painful procedures and anxiety in the pediatric population. <br/><br/>Design: Four staff guided the first month of the iPod Intervention: two child life specialists and two RNs. CED Child life specialists were largely responsible for implementing the iPod Intervention. However, all CED Staff were encouraged to refer patients who might benefit from music therapy. A log was designed to track the demographics of patients who used the intervention and also helped busy staff keep track of the equipment. Satisfaction with the intervention was evaluated using an investigator-designed 4 question survey which was available in both English and Spanish. The survey provided an opportunity for both patients (or their parents) and CED staff to provide feedback.<br/><br/>Setting: The Children's Emergency Department is a part of a teaching, urban level I trauma one center in a capital city of the southern United States. The Children's Emergency Department sees an average annual volume of 45,000, from newborn to 17 years of age. <br/><br/>Participants/Subjects: The iPod Intervention was piloted on 50 patients and their families over the course of a four week period. Patients with moderate to severe pain such as sickle cell crisis, a fracture or a migraine headache, and patients who underwent painful procedures such as an incision and drainage, a laceration repair, IV insertion, or lumbar puncture were targeted while the four staff who guided the project staffed.<br/><br/>Methods: 4 iPod Nano models of different colors were loaded with music for different age groups. The iPod Nano model was chosen because its video screen allowed for greater patient and parental control of the music chosen. Patients had the option of listening to the iPod with earphones or by using a docking station with speakers. Both patient and parental feedback were gathered using a 4 question survey for each iPod user in the pilot study. <br/><br/>Results/Outcomes: Eighty-six percent (n=50) of the patients and families in the pilot group reported that listening to music via the iPod was &quot;helpful&quot; or &quot;very helpful&quot; in reducing their pain and/or discomfort. The iPods not only provided a welcome distraction from the patient's pain, but also reduced distress and anxiety in parents. Thus, a secondary benefit of the iPod Intervention was improved customer service which was reflected in an increase in departmental scores for pain management and overall quality of care. <br/><br/>Implications: Because of the demonstrated success of this program, the iPod Intervention is believed to be an initiative that holds promise for every patient in every setting. Per Leora Kuttner, Ph.D, one of the foremost authorities on working with children in pain, &quot;Music&agrave;can be a fine aid in shifting attention away from pain and onto a very pleasant alternative. Music needs to be included more often in the treatment and recovery process for children (Kuttner, 1996).&quot; <br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:27:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:27:52Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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