Using Peer Interviewing to Reduce Nursing Turnover and Vacancy and Improve Staff Satisfaction

16.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162424
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Using Peer Interviewing to Reduce Nursing Turnover and Vacancy and Improve Staff Satisfaction
Abstract:
Using Peer Interviewing to Reduce Nursing Turnover and Vacancy and Improve Staff Satisfaction
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2011
Author:Crawford, Laura, RN, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:Beverly Hospital
Title:Director, Emergency Services and Critical Care
Contact Address:85 Herrick Street, Beverly, MA, 01915, USA
Contact Telephone:978-922-3000, x2780
Co-Authors:Patricia Letourneau, RN, MSN
[ENA Leadership Conference] Evidence-based Practice Presentation: "Using Peer Interviewing to Reduce Nursing Turnover and Vacancy and Improve Staff Satisfaction."

Purpose: The purpose of this project was to introduce peer interviewing to address persistent RN turnover and vacancy and staff dissatisfaction with agency staffing.

Background: Emergency Department Nursing Leadership identified peer interviewing as a strategy to improve nursing retention by engaging staff in the hiring process. A peer interview team was selected from a pool of volunteers representing all three shifts. The goals of the team included choosing qualified candidates, matching the candidate to a preceptor and engaging the staff to support the candidate's success. Behavioral interview questions were used and at the end of each interview, the team and nurse manager meet to make a hiring recommendation.

Design: This was a performance improvement project designed to validate the success of using the peer interview process. A survey of newly hired nurses and the peer interview team was conducted.

Setting: The performance improvement project was conducted between May of 2008 and November 2009 in the on-site emergency department of a community hospital with annual ED visits 49,000.

Participants/Subjects: The peer interview team sample included seven nurses on the peer interview team. Years of ED nursing experience ranged from three to twenty five years.
The nurse candidate sample included fifteen nurses hired using the peer interview process.

Methods: Participants in both groups completed a four-question five level agreement linkert scale survey. Questions for the nurse candidates rated the peer interview process in terms of developing a realistic view of the department and job requirements, success in matching preceptor to candidate and the role of the peer interview process in influencing job satisfaction. Questions for the peer interview team rated the peer interview process in terms of understanding the role of behavioral interviewing to select qualified candidates, integration of new hires into the department, empowerment of the peer interview team, and influence on staff satisfaction.

Results/Outcomes: 86% return rate from the newly hired nurse group. 100% strongly agreed that the process helped their transition into the department. 100% strongly agreed that the peer interview process influenced their job satisfaction, and all agreed that their preceptor was a good match for their personality and learning style.
100% of surveys were returned from the peer interview team. All agreed that they felt empowered by being part of the team, and that staff satisfaction had improved by using this process.
Retention rate for nurses hired using the peer interview process is 89%. Retention rate for the eight-month period prior to implementing the peer interview process was 50%. RN vacancy rate has been reduced from 34.6 % to 2% since inception of the project. Monthly agency expense has been reduced from $183,000 in May 2008 to $0 in June 2010, translating into an annualized cost savings of $237,000.

Practice Implications: Findings demonstrate that using the peer interview process is effective in improving nurse retention. Sharing hiring responsibility with staff provides an opportunity to strengthen teamwork and improve staff support for newly hired nurses.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUsing Peer Interviewing to Reduce Nursing Turnover and Vacancy and Improve Staff Satisfactionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162424-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Using Peer Interviewing to Reduce Nursing Turnover and Vacancy and Improve Staff Satisfaction</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2011</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Crawford, Laura, RN, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Beverly Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Director, Emergency Services and Critical Care</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">85 Herrick Street, Beverly, MA, 01915, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">978-922-3000, x2780</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lcrawfor@nhs-healthlink.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Patricia Letourneau, RN, MSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[ENA Leadership Conference] Evidence-based Practice Presentation: &quot;Using Peer Interviewing to Reduce Nursing Turnover and Vacancy and Improve Staff Satisfaction.&quot;<br/><br/>Purpose: The purpose of this project was to introduce peer interviewing to address persistent RN turnover and vacancy and staff dissatisfaction with agency staffing.<br/><br/>Background: Emergency Department Nursing Leadership identified peer interviewing as a strategy to improve nursing retention by engaging staff in the hiring process. A peer interview team was selected from a pool of volunteers representing all three shifts. The goals of the team included choosing qualified candidates, matching the candidate to a preceptor and engaging the staff to support the candidate's success. Behavioral interview questions were used and at the end of each interview, the team and nurse manager meet to make a hiring recommendation. <br/><br/>Design: This was a performance improvement project designed to validate the success of using the peer interview process. A survey of newly hired nurses and the peer interview team was conducted. <br/><br/>Setting: The performance improvement project was conducted between May of 2008 and November 2009 in the on-site emergency department of a community hospital with annual ED visits 49,000.<br/><br/>Participants/Subjects: The peer interview team sample included seven nurses on the peer interview team. Years of ED nursing experience ranged from three to twenty five years.<br/>The nurse candidate sample included fifteen nurses hired using the peer interview process.<br/><br/>Methods: Participants in both groups completed a four-question five level agreement linkert scale survey. Questions for the nurse candidates rated the peer interview process in terms of developing a realistic view of the department and job requirements, success in matching preceptor to candidate and the role of the peer interview process in influencing job satisfaction. Questions for the peer interview team rated the peer interview process in terms of understanding the role of behavioral interviewing to select qualified candidates, integration of new hires into the department, empowerment of the peer interview team, and influence on staff satisfaction.<br/><br/>Results/Outcomes: 86% return rate from the newly hired nurse group. 100% strongly agreed that the process helped their transition into the department. 100% strongly agreed that the peer interview process influenced their job satisfaction, and all agreed that their preceptor was a good match for their personality and learning style. <br/>100% of surveys were returned from the peer interview team. All agreed that they felt empowered by being part of the team, and that staff satisfaction had improved by using this process. <br/>Retention rate for nurses hired using the peer interview process is 89%. Retention rate for the eight-month period prior to implementing the peer interview process was 50%. RN vacancy rate has been reduced from 34.6 % to 2% since inception of the project. Monthly agency expense has been reduced from $183,000 in May 2008 to $0 in June 2010, translating into an annualized cost savings of $237,000. <br/><br/>Practice Implications: Findings demonstrate that using the peer interview process is effective in improving nurse retention. Sharing hiring responsibility with staff provides an opportunity to strengthen teamwork and improve staff support for newly hired nurses. <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:27:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:27:59Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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