2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162425
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Structural Empowerment
Abstract:
Structural Empowerment
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2011
Author:DeVivo, Diane, RN, DNP, MPA
P.I. Institution Name:North Shore LiJ Health System Plainview Hospital
Title:Director of Nursing Emergency Services, Patient Flow
Contact Address:888 Old Country Road, Plainview, NY, 11803, USA
Contact Telephone:516-719-2433
[ENA Leadership Conference] Research Presentation: Structural Empowerment

Purpose: Empowerment in nursing has become increasingly important in healthcare facilities for nursing leadership. Increasing nurse empowerment may involve changing work structures and enhancing access to the sources of work empowerment, with the expectation that nurses who perceive their work environment to be empowering are more likely to engage in effective work practices and provide higher quality nursing care (Laschinger et al., 1997). They also attain a standard of professional practice, are committed to their specialty, and assist in creating an organization that supports positive patient outcomes.

Design: This study was a descriptive comparative study.

Setting: The setting was the staff at six hospitals in a multi- hospital health system in the northeast. Two were tertiary hospitals, one of which is a level 1 trauma center, and four were community hospitals.

Participants: There were 240 staff RNs that worked in the emergency departments at these facilities, who were eligible to participate in the study.

Methods: The Conditions of Work Effectiveness II Questionnaire (CWEQûII) is a Likert-style survey with 19 questions consisting of six subscales. The first four subscales, which contain three questions each, refer to Kanter's four empowerment structures (opportunity, information, support, resources). The next section, entitled the Jobs Activities Scale (JAS-II), consists of three items that measure formal power. The third section, the Organizational Relationship Scale (ORS -II), uses four items to measure informal power. The average scores of the six subscales are added to create the total empowerment score (score range, 6-30). The staff received an envelope with the CWEQ-II survey, and the completion of the survey was considered their consent to participate.

Results/Outcomes: Two-hundred forty questionnaires were distributed to the six study sites. Of the 240 that were distributed, 172 (72%) were returned; of those, 167 (97%) were eligible for use. The CWEQ-II was used for this study to measure structural empowerment. According to Laschinger et al. (2001), scores ranging from 6 to 13 are described as low levels of empowerment, 14 to 22 as moderate levels of empowerment, and 23 to 30 as high levels of empowerment. The majority of the RNs in this study perceived themselves as being moderately empowered, with an empowerment score of 21.25 out of a maximum possible score of 30. Formal power, as measured by the Job Activities Scale (JAS), was 3.25; informal power, as measured by the Organizational Relationship Scale (ORS), was 3.71.

Implications: The belief is that nurses who perceive their work environment to be empowering are more likely to provide high quality nursing care with positive outcomes. They are also committed to the organization which can have a positive effect on recruitment and retention. These results support the relevance of using strategies derived from Kanter's theory of workplace structural empowerment in attempts to create nursing work environments that foster professional practice and promote job satisfaction and commitment among staff nurses (Laschinger et al., 2003).

This was the first study to look at structural empowerment of emergency department nurses, and also the first to look at certification (CEN) in relation to empowerment of nurses. There was no significant difference in empowerment levels between nurses that were certified in emergency nursing and nurses who were not.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStructural Empowermenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162425-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Structural Empowerment</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2011</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">DeVivo, Diane, RN, DNP, MPA</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">North Shore LiJ Health System Plainview Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Director of Nursing Emergency Services, Patient Flow</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">888 Old Country Road, Plainview, NY, 11803, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">516-719-2433</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ddevivo@nshs.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[ENA Leadership Conference] Research Presentation: Structural Empowerment<br/><br/>Purpose: Empowerment in nursing has become increasingly important in healthcare facilities for nursing leadership. Increasing nurse empowerment may involve changing work structures and enhancing access to the sources of work empowerment, with the expectation that nurses who perceive their work environment to be empowering are more likely to engage in effective work practices and provide higher quality nursing care (Laschinger et al., 1997). They also attain a standard of professional practice, are committed to their specialty, and assist in creating an organization that supports positive patient outcomes.<br/><br/>Design: This study was a descriptive comparative study. <br/><br/>Setting: The setting was the staff at six hospitals in a multi- hospital health system in the northeast. Two were tertiary hospitals, one of which is a level 1 trauma center, and four were community hospitals.<br/><br/>Participants: There were 240 staff RNs that worked in the emergency departments at these facilities, who were eligible to participate in the study. <br/><br/>Methods: The Conditions of Work Effectiveness II Questionnaire (CWEQ&ucirc;II) is a Likert-style survey with 19 questions consisting of six subscales. The first four subscales, which contain three questions each, refer to Kanter's four empowerment structures (opportunity, information, support, resources). The next section, entitled the Jobs Activities Scale (JAS-II), consists of three items that measure formal power. The third section, the Organizational Relationship Scale (ORS -II), uses four items to measure informal power. The average scores of the six subscales are added to create the total empowerment score (score range, 6-30). The staff received an envelope with the CWEQ-II survey, and the completion of the survey was considered their consent to participate. <br/><br/> Results/Outcomes: Two-hundred forty questionnaires were distributed to the six study sites. Of the 240 that were distributed, 172 (72%) were returned; of those, 167 (97%) were eligible for use. The CWEQ-II was used for this study to measure structural empowerment. According to Laschinger et al. (2001), scores ranging from 6 to 13 are described as low levels of empowerment, 14 to 22 as moderate levels of empowerment, and 23 to 30 as high levels of empowerment. The majority of the RNs in this study perceived themselves as being moderately empowered, with an empowerment score of 21.25 out of a maximum possible score of 30. Formal power, as measured by the Job Activities Scale (JAS), was 3.25; informal power, as measured by the Organizational Relationship Scale (ORS), was 3.71.<br/><br/> Implications: The belief is that nurses who perceive their work environment to be empowering are more likely to provide high quality nursing care with positive outcomes. They are also committed to the organization which can have a positive effect on recruitment and retention. These results support the relevance of using strategies derived from Kanter's theory of workplace structural empowerment in attempts to create nursing work environments that foster professional practice and promote job satisfaction and commitment among staff nurses (Laschinger et al., 2003).<br/><br/> This was the first study to look at structural empowerment of emergency department nurses, and also the first to look at certification (CEN) in relation to empowerment of nurses. There was no significant difference in empowerment levels between nurses that were certified in emergency nursing and nurses who were not.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:28:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:28:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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