2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162427
Type:
Presentation
Title:
It's not Personal; it's just Physics!
Abstract:
It's not Personal; it's just Physics!
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2011
Author:Dillon, Keri, RN, BSN, CEN
P.I. Institution Name:Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center
Title:Nurse Clinician III
Contact Address:836 W. Wellington, Chicago, IL, 60657, USA
Contact Telephone:773-296-5878
[ENA Leadership Conference] Evidence-based Practice Presentation: It's Not Personal; it's Just Physic's!

Purpose: Hemolyzed specimens can lead to inaccurate laboratory values and delays in patient care. This is significant for Emergency Departments (ED), as lab results can be time sensitive. The ED shared governance council developed a weekly intervention for a six week period to analyze various changes in blood collection in order to evaluate the effect on hemolysis rates. At the time of data collection, the national average of hemolysis was 2%, with the ED at 3%. The overall purpose of this performance improvement project was to determine the causes of hemolysis and measure the effect of the interventions in the ED.

Setting: The setting is a Midwestern, urban teaching facility and Level I trauma center, treating 40,000 patients annually.

Participants/Subjects: All patients who had blood drawn in the Emergency Department were part of this study to evaluate hemolysis rates.

Design: This study was an interdisciplinary performance improvement project, aimed at reducing hemolysis rates and improving ED efficiancy.

Methods: A literature review was conducted and evidence-based interventions were identified to decrease hemolysis rates. The methodology involved studying hemolysis rates and delays in lab turnaround time over a six week period, with a different weekly intervention. The following interventions were initiated: 1) adding foam liners to pneumatic tube system; 2) not drawing blood from peripheral intravenous catheters (PIV) placed prior to arrival to the ED; 3) inserting a 20 gauge PIV or higher in the forearm or above; 4) tourniquet rule; 5) not attaching the cap to the PIV prior to blood draw; and 6) storing blood upright when drawn prior to order placement. Additionally, all staff members were educated on the correct order of specimen collection, proper technique in cleansing the skin prior to insertion of a PIV, and not sending a blood tube that was drawn greater than two hours prior to the order being placed. A log book was used to record hemolyzed specimens in the lab, and was part of the data collection.

Results/Outcomes: After six weeks of weekly interventions, the greatest success in decreasing the hemolysis rate was not drawing blood specimens from PIV sites placed prior to arrival to the ED, with a hemolysis rate of 1.5%.

Conclusion: In conclusion, by implementing evidence-based practice interventions to blood collection in the ED, hemolysis rates were decreased and thus improved lab turnaround times, patient care, and reduced the risk of inaccurate lab values. Interdisciplinary collaboration, proper staff education, and peer coaching were keys to producing successful outcomes.

Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIt's not Personal; it's just Physics!en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162427-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">It's not Personal; it's just Physics!</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2011</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Dillon, Keri, RN, BSN, CEN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nurse Clinician III</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">836 W. Wellington, Chicago, IL, 60657, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">773-296-5878</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">keri.kramper@gmail.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[ENA Leadership Conference] Evidence-based Practice Presentation: It's Not Personal; it's Just Physic's!<br/><br/>Purpose: Hemolyzed specimens can lead to inaccurate laboratory values and delays in patient care. This is significant for Emergency Departments (ED), as lab results can be time sensitive. The ED shared governance council developed a weekly intervention for a six week period to analyze various changes in blood collection in order to evaluate the effect on hemolysis rates. At the time of data collection, the national average of hemolysis was 2%, with the ED at 3%. The overall purpose of this performance improvement project was to determine the causes of hemolysis and measure the effect of the interventions in the ED.<br/><br/>Setting: The setting is a Midwestern, urban teaching facility and Level I trauma center, treating 40,000 patients annually.<br/><br/>Participants/Subjects: All patients who had blood drawn in the Emergency Department were part of this study to evaluate hemolysis rates.<br/><br/>Design: This study was an interdisciplinary performance improvement project, aimed at reducing hemolysis rates and improving ED efficiancy.<br/><br/>Methods: A literature review was conducted and evidence-based interventions were identified to decrease hemolysis rates. The methodology involved studying hemolysis rates and delays in lab turnaround time over a six week period, with a different weekly intervention. The following interventions were initiated: 1) adding foam liners to pneumatic tube system; 2) not drawing blood from peripheral intravenous catheters (PIV) placed prior to arrival to the ED; 3) inserting a 20 gauge PIV or higher in the forearm or above; 4) tourniquet rule; 5) not attaching the cap to the PIV prior to blood draw; and 6) storing blood upright when drawn prior to order placement. Additionally, all staff members were educated on the correct order of specimen collection, proper technique in cleansing the skin prior to insertion of a PIV, and not sending a blood tube that was drawn greater than two hours prior to the order being placed. A log book was used to record hemolyzed specimens in the lab, and was part of the data collection. <br/><br/>Results/Outcomes: After six weeks of weekly interventions, the greatest success in decreasing the hemolysis rate was not drawing blood specimens from PIV sites placed prior to arrival to the ED, with a hemolysis rate of 1.5%.<br/><br/>Conclusion: In conclusion, by implementing evidence-based practice interventions to blood collection in the ED, hemolysis rates were decreased and thus improved lab turnaround times, patient care, and reduced the risk of inaccurate lab values. Interdisciplinary collaboration, proper staff education, and peer coaching were keys to producing successful outcomes.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:28:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:28:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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