2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162431
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Trauma Report Nurse: A Leader with the Link
Abstract:
The Trauma Report Nurse: A Leader with the Link
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2011
Author:Jelinek, Lisa, RN, BSN, CEN, SANE, NREMT-B
P.I. Institution Name:Mayo Clinic Rochester
Title:Staff Nurse
Contact Address:200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN, 55905, USA
Contact Telephone:507-255-5385
[ENA Leadership Conference] Evidence-based Practice Presentation: The Trauma Report Nurse: A Team Leader with the Link.

Purpose: Trauma patient leveling in a 60-bed Emergency Department can be a daunting task. History has shown that physicians may be occupied with life-saving interventions and unavailable to take pre-hospital report. Pre-hospital providers have demonstrated undertriage rates as high as 48 percent. Without a consistent process to take report and level trauma patients, the duty is often done incorrectly or not done at all. A system was needed to consistently and accurately level trauma patients. A practice improvement pilot project was designed. The project purpose was to evaluate a Trauma Report Nurse/Team Leader role.

Design: In April 2009 a Trauma Report Nurse (TRN) role was created. The TRN was charged with maintaining situational awareness, preparing for incoming patients, mentoring novice nurses, coordinating assignments, facilitating patient dispositions and most importantly leveling the traumas. The TRN also served as the nurse team leader for the critical care area. When a trauma patient was en route to the hospital, the emergency dispatcher notified the TRN. The TRN would take the pre-hospital report and assign the patient a trauma level, based on the trauma program's established triage criteria. At this point the trauma team was activated. Upon the trauma team's arrival, the TRN provided report.

Setting: Rural, Level 1 Adult and Pediatric Trauma Center.

Participants: 40 TRN's were selected who met the following criteria: Charge nurse, involvement with the trauma committee, trauma ICU experience or having completed the Advanced Trauma Care for Nurses (ATCN) course. They were required to be a triage nurse, have a positive attitude towards change, strong communication skills and the ability to use the trauma triage criteria.

Methods: A 3 month pilot period was initiated. The selected nurses and charge nurses attended a 1 hour training session. Individual TRNs and the TRN process were evaluated by emergency department staff using a questionnaire and based on this feedback, minor process adjustments were made.

Results/Outcomes: The pilot was deemed successful as the under-triage rates improved from 7.0% to 1.9%. The Emergency Department staff considered the TRNÆs very supportive and reported an increased knowledge of incoming trauma patients.

Implications: When the 3 month pilot program ended, the TRN role became standard practice. In fact, the team leader role was expanded to all areas of the Emergency Department. The TRN process is adaptable and may be beneficial for other Level 1 adult and pediatric trauma centers.

Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Trauma Report Nurse: A Leader with the Linken_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162431-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Trauma Report Nurse: A Leader with the Link</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2011</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jelinek, Lisa, RN, BSN, CEN, SANE, NREMT-B</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Mayo Clinic Rochester</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Staff Nurse</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN, 55905, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">507-255-5385</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jelinek.lisa@mayo.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[ENA Leadership Conference] Evidence-based Practice Presentation: The Trauma Report Nurse: A Team Leader with the Link.<br/><br/>Purpose: Trauma patient leveling in a 60-bed Emergency Department can be a daunting task. History has shown that physicians may be occupied with life-saving interventions and unavailable to take pre-hospital report. Pre-hospital providers have demonstrated undertriage rates as high as 48 percent. Without a consistent process to take report and level trauma patients, the duty is often done incorrectly or not done at all. A system was needed to consistently and accurately level trauma patients. A practice improvement pilot project was designed. The project purpose was to evaluate a Trauma Report Nurse/Team Leader role.<br/><br/>Design: In April 2009 a Trauma Report Nurse (TRN) role was created. The TRN was charged with maintaining situational awareness, preparing for incoming patients, mentoring novice nurses, coordinating assignments, facilitating patient dispositions and most importantly leveling the traumas. The TRN also served as the nurse team leader for the critical care area. When a trauma patient was en route to the hospital, the emergency dispatcher notified the TRN. The TRN would take the pre-hospital report and assign the patient a trauma level, based on the trauma program's established triage criteria. At this point the trauma team was activated. Upon the trauma team's arrival, the TRN provided report. <br/><br/>Setting: Rural, Level 1 Adult and Pediatric Trauma Center.<br/><br/>Participants: 40 TRN's were selected who met the following criteria: Charge nurse, involvement with the trauma committee, trauma ICU experience or having completed the Advanced Trauma Care for Nurses (ATCN) course. They were required to be a triage nurse, have a positive attitude towards change, strong communication skills and the ability to use the trauma triage criteria. <br/><br/>Methods: A 3 month pilot period was initiated. The selected nurses and charge nurses attended a 1 hour training session. Individual TRNs and the TRN process were evaluated by emergency department staff using a questionnaire and based on this feedback, minor process adjustments were made. <br/><br/> Results/Outcomes: The pilot was deemed successful as the under-triage rates improved from 7.0% to 1.9%. The Emergency Department staff considered the TRN&AElig;s very supportive and reported an increased knowledge of incoming trauma patients. <br/><br/>Implications: When the 3 month pilot program ended, the TRN role became standard practice. In fact, the team leader role was expanded to all areas of the Emergency Department. The TRN process is adaptable and may be beneficial for other Level 1 adult and pediatric trauma centers. <br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:28:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:28:06Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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