2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162442
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Triage Intake Team Implementation
Abstract:
A Triage Intake Team Implementation
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2011
Author:Schultz, Sharon M., RN, MS, CEN
P.I. Institution Name:Lutheran Medical Center
Title:Clinical Nurse Specialist
Contact Address:8300 West 38th Avenue, Wheat Ridge, CO, 80005, USA
Contact Telephone:303-425-8216
Co-Authors:Beverly White, RN, MSN, CEN
[ENA Leadership Conference] Evidence-based Practice Presentation: A Triage Intake Team Implementation

Purpose: Emergency departments (ED) nationwide are challenged to serve an increasing volume of patients while promoting efficiency and patient satisfaction. Current literature suggests that patient satisfaction with their ED experience is directly tied to the length of time it takes to see a physician.

Design: An improved performance physician/nurse/technician Triage Intake Team was implemented focusing on the initial ED patient contact experience. Goals included reducing physician initial assessment time and the number of patients who left without being seen due to long waits as well as early initiation of patient specific treatment. In addition to facilitating flow through the department, it was projected these process changes would improve patient ED experience satisfaction.

Setting: A non-teaching community Level III emergency department with 52 beds and 70,000 visits annually.

Participant/Subjects: All patients presenting to the emergency department for treatment during selected hours.

Methods: The initial Triage Intake Team consisted of one physician, two nurses, one technician in a five bed triage area. The team members were chosen based on their interest in the process and commitment to the goals. For consistency during the early phase of implementation and evaluation, the team was initially limited to this core group. Planning meetings addressed potential barriers and arrangements were made for operational issues such as computer support, portable phones and triage printers. Optimal times of high volume were identified for greatest impact on flow. As the new process impacted several other ED processes, care was taken to identify all relevant stakeholders and education was offered to the physician and staff groups as needed. Expectations were: rapid patient assessment at triage, implementation of necessary orders, and timely transfer to a room in the main ED. Lower acuity patients with minor chief complaints were evaluated, treated and discharged directly from triage.

Results/Outcomes: Implementation began in January 2010 with an immediate impact noted on several key goals of the process. Routine leadership rounding reported an immediate positive impact on patient satisfaction, as well as staff and physician satisfaction. Audits of patient length of stay, patients who left without being seen and patient satisfaction improved almost immediately, and remained consistently positive. The process was so effective in reducing triage backlog that frequently the intake team can circulate throughout the ED performing rapid intake triage at the bedside for patients who arrive by ambulance.

Implications: The implementation of the Triage Intake Team exceeded initial goals of reduced door to physician time, fewer patients who left without being seen and early initiation of patient specific treatment. Currently, expanding intake team hours is being explored. Initial reports are promising and ongoing evaluation continues, however the opportunity to improve triage systems offers lessons that may benefit other emergency departments.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Triage Intake Team Implementationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162442-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Triage Intake Team Implementation</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2011</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Schultz, Sharon M., RN, MS, CEN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Lutheran Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Nurse Specialist</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">8300 West 38th Avenue, Wheat Ridge, CO, 80005, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">303-425-8216</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">schultzs@exempla.org; sharon_schultz@hotmail.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Beverly White, RN, MSN, CEN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[ENA Leadership Conference] Evidence-based Practice Presentation: A Triage Intake Team Implementation <br/><br/>Purpose: Emergency departments (ED) nationwide are challenged to serve an increasing volume of patients while promoting efficiency and patient satisfaction. Current literature suggests that patient satisfaction with their ED experience is directly tied to the length of time it takes to see a physician. <br/><br/>Design: An improved performance physician/nurse/technician Triage Intake Team was implemented focusing on the initial ED patient contact experience. Goals included reducing physician initial assessment time and the number of patients who left without being seen due to long waits as well as early initiation of patient specific treatment. In addition to facilitating flow through the department, it was projected these process changes would improve patient ED experience satisfaction. <br/><br/>Setting: A non-teaching community Level III emergency department with 52 beds and 70,000 visits annually.<br/><br/>Participant/Subjects: All patients presenting to the emergency department for treatment during selected hours.<br/><br/>Methods: The initial Triage Intake Team consisted of one physician, two nurses, one technician in a five bed triage area. The team members were chosen based on their interest in the process and commitment to the goals. For consistency during the early phase of implementation and evaluation, the team was initially limited to this core group. Planning meetings addressed potential barriers and arrangements were made for operational issues such as computer support, portable phones and triage printers. Optimal times of high volume were identified for greatest impact on flow. As the new process impacted several other ED processes, care was taken to identify all relevant stakeholders and education was offered to the physician and staff groups as needed. Expectations were: rapid patient assessment at triage, implementation of necessary orders, and timely transfer to a room in the main ED. Lower acuity patients with minor chief complaints were evaluated, treated and discharged directly from triage. <br/><br/>Results/Outcomes: Implementation began in January 2010 with an immediate impact noted on several key goals of the process. Routine leadership rounding reported an immediate positive impact on patient satisfaction, as well as staff and physician satisfaction. Audits of patient length of stay, patients who left without being seen and patient satisfaction improved almost immediately, and remained consistently positive. The process was so effective in reducing triage backlog that frequently the intake team can circulate throughout the ED performing rapid intake triage at the bedside for patients who arrive by ambulance. <br/><br/>Implications: The implementation of the Triage Intake Team exceeded initial goals of reduced door to physician time, fewer patients who left without being seen and early initiation of patient specific treatment. Currently, expanding intake team hours is being explored. Initial reports are promising and ongoing evaluation continues, however the opportunity to improve triage systems offers lessons that may benefit other emergency departments. <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:28:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:28:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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