2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162454
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cultivating Graduate Nurses in a Pediatric Emergency Department
Abstract:
Cultivating Graduate Nurses in a Pediatric Emergency Department
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2008
Author:Morin, Michele, RN, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:Children's Hospital Boston
Title:Clinical Nurse Specialist
Contact Address:, Boston, MA, 02115-, USA
Co-Authors:Anne Meginniss, RN, BSN; Denise Downey, RN, MSN
Purpose: To support the transition of newly graduated nurses into a career as pediatric emergency nurses. The Education Team, consisting of the Clinical Nurse Specialist, Educators and preceptors, developed a competency-based orientation program aimed at transitioning the new graduate to registered nurse.

Design: Nurses completed questionnaires that asked for feedback about the new graduate orientation program and suggestions for future programs. Both new graduates and experienced nurse preceptors completed the questionnaire.

Setting: Large urban level-1 pediatric trauma center and teaching facility located in Northeastern Massachusetts that treats 54,000 patients annually.

Participants/Subjects: All new staff completing the orientation program gave feedback for improving and changing orientation.

Methods: New staff and preceptors completed the questionnaire three months after finishing orientation using a Likert scale. The questions ranged from clinical preparedness, adequacy of resources, mentorship, and content of didactic sessions. Also asking, "Was your orientation too long, too short, or just about right?" allowed the participants to rate the length of the program. Weekly self-evaluations and preceptor evaluations were reviewed by the Clinical Nurse Specialist with real time interventions provided when needed. Evaluations are shared to promote communication and short-term goal setting. This is followed by a sixth-month evaluation to set long-term goals for the one-year anniversary of the novice nurse.

Results: The orientation program in 2004 was 6-8 weeks regardless of experience. During this year, the program lost 33 % of the new graduates after their first year. In 2005, new graduate orientation was 22 weeks with four additional mentoring weeks. In this year, the department lost 16 % from the program after the first year. In 2006, the orientation program was streamlined to 14 weeks with four additional mentoring weeks based on feedback from the 2005 participants. Currently, the New Graduate Orientation Program consists of six former Emergency Department Clinical Assistants who are now Registered Nurses and participating in the 14/4 week program. Thus far the feedback from the orientees has been positive about this innovative orientation program.

Recommendations: The current orientation program will continue utilizing and encouraging the department's clinical assistants enrolled in a nursing program to stay within the department after graduating. The Education Group will continue to mentor and cultivate the Clinical Assistants transitioning to Registered Nurses in the Emergency Department. This program is aligned with the institution's mission to incorporate new graduate nurses in the workforce.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCultivating Graduate Nurses in a Pediatric Emergency Departmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162454-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Cultivating Graduate Nurses in a Pediatric Emergency Department</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2008</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Morin, Michele, RN, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Children's Hospital Boston</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Nurse Specialist</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, Boston, MA, 02115-, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Michele.Morin@childrens.harvard.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Anne Meginniss, RN, BSN; Denise Downey, RN, MSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To support the transition of newly graduated nurses into a career as pediatric emergency nurses. The Education Team, consisting of the Clinical Nurse Specialist, Educators and preceptors, developed a competency-based orientation program aimed at transitioning the new graduate to registered nurse.<br/><br/>Design: Nurses completed questionnaires that asked for feedback about the new graduate orientation program and suggestions for future programs. Both new graduates and experienced nurse preceptors completed the questionnaire.<br/><br/>Setting: Large urban level-1 pediatric trauma center and teaching facility located in Northeastern Massachusetts that treats 54,000 patients annually.<br/><br/>Participants/Subjects: All new staff completing the orientation program gave feedback for improving and changing orientation.<br/><br/>Methods: New staff and preceptors completed the questionnaire three months after finishing orientation using a Likert scale. The questions ranged from clinical preparedness, adequacy of resources, mentorship, and content of didactic sessions. Also asking, &quot;Was your orientation too long, too short, or just about right?&quot; allowed the participants to rate the length of the program. Weekly self-evaluations and preceptor evaluations were reviewed by the Clinical Nurse Specialist with real time interventions provided when needed. Evaluations are shared to promote communication and short-term goal setting. This is followed by a sixth-month evaluation to set long-term goals for the one-year anniversary of the novice nurse.<br/><br/>Results: The orientation program in 2004 was 6-8 weeks regardless of experience. During this year, the program lost 33 % of the new graduates after their first year. In 2005, new graduate orientation was 22 weeks with four additional mentoring weeks. In this year, the department lost 16 % from the program after the first year. In 2006, the orientation program was streamlined to 14 weeks with four additional mentoring weeks based on feedback from the 2005 participants. Currently, the New Graduate Orientation Program consists of six former Emergency Department Clinical Assistants who are now Registered Nurses and participating in the 14/4 week program. Thus far the feedback from the orientees has been positive about this innovative orientation program.<br/><br/>Recommendations: The current orientation program will continue utilizing and encouraging the department's clinical assistants enrolled in a nursing program to stay within the department after graduating. The Education Group will continue to mentor and cultivate the Clinical Assistants transitioning to Registered Nurses in the Emergency Department. This program is aligned with the institution's mission to incorporate new graduate nurses in the workforce.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:28:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:28:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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