Mentoring without Borders: Improving Emergency Nursing Through an International Collaboration

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162455
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Mentoring without Borders: Improving Emergency Nursing Through an International Collaboration
Abstract:
Mentoring without Borders: Improving Emergency Nursing Through an International Collaboration
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2008
Author:Palmer, Sheri P., RN, MS, CEN
P.I. Institution Name:Brigham Young University, College of Nursing
Title:Associate Professor of Nursing
Staff Nurse - Emergency Department American Fork Hospital, Utah
Contact Address:Box 500, SWKT, Provo, UT, 84602-, USA
Contact Telephone:(801) 422-1306
Co-Authors:Sondra Heaston, APRN, MS, NP-C, CEN
Purpose: Improving care in the emergency department of a large welfare hospital in Ecuador is a common goal among our nursing faculty. With a large daily census and limited resources, the current nursing leadership requested help to improve quality of care. Leadership mentoring was thought to be the most beneficial tool we could provide in improving overall function of the department.
The Ecuador Project is a yearly collaboration with hospitals in Guayaquil, Ecuador and a College of Nursing in Provo, Utah. The history of other past projects have included classes for the nursing staff in technical skills, life-saving techniques, and nursing process and assessment. Success in these classes over the last few years have been phenomenal, however it was felt to have a lasting impact on quality of health, there was a need to teach the teachers and mentor the leaders.

Design: This is a descriptive study of a technique in international leadership mentorship and education among managers and visiting faculty/nurses.

Setting: The hospital in Guayaquil, Ecuador is a large welfare hospital. The Emergency Department saw 52,629 patients in 2006. The hospital system is run by a charity assembly that provides health care to a large percentage of Ecuadorians. Due to the hospital being a provider of charity care, it runs with compromised resources in most of its areas, but most notably in the Emergency Department.

Participants: The participants in the course included the chief nursing officer and managers of various units of the hospital, three of whom supervised units in the Emergency Department. Three faculty members who have specialties in Emergency Nursing from the United States were the visiting nurses mentoring leadership techniques and providing educational classes.

Methods: In May 2007, a two-day workshop was developed with the needs of the managers in mind. Highlights of the course were: objectives, methods, and evaluation of teaching; critical thinking exercises; organizing lectures; test-question writing; using PowerPoint and Internet resources effectively.

Results: The class was successful and dynamic. The participants were eager to set goals, implement changes, and assess for improved quality nursing care. They were excited to follow-through on unit goals, and felt that improvements were not just a wish, but were indeed within their grasp.

Recommendations: Contact with the participants is continuing throughout this year. The goal is to mentor them in educating their own nurses, and improving leadership capabilities.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMentoring without Borders: Improving Emergency Nursing Through an International Collaborationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162455-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Mentoring without Borders: Improving Emergency Nursing Through an International Collaboration</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2008</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Palmer, Sheri P., RN, MS, CEN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Brigham Young University, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor of Nursing<br/>Staff Nurse - Emergency Department American Fork Hospital, Utah<br/></td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Box 500, SWKT, Provo, UT, 84602-, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(801) 422-1306</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Sondra-Heaston@byu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Sondra Heaston, APRN, MS, NP-C, CEN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Improving care in the emergency department of a large welfare hospital in Ecuador is a common goal among our nursing faculty. With a large daily census and limited resources, the current nursing leadership requested help to improve quality of care. Leadership mentoring was thought to be the most beneficial tool we could provide in improving overall function of the department. <br/>The Ecuador Project is a yearly collaboration with hospitals in Guayaquil, Ecuador and a College of Nursing in Provo, Utah. The history of other past projects have included classes for the nursing staff in technical skills, life-saving techniques, and nursing process and assessment. Success in these classes over the last few years have been phenomenal, however it was felt to have a lasting impact on quality of health, there was a need to teach the teachers and mentor the leaders. <br/><br/>Design: This is a descriptive study of a technique in international leadership mentorship and education among managers and visiting faculty/nurses. <br/><br/>Setting: The hospital in Guayaquil, Ecuador is a large welfare hospital. The Emergency Department saw 52,629 patients in 2006. The hospital system is run by a charity assembly that provides health care to a large percentage of Ecuadorians. Due to the hospital being a provider of charity care, it runs with compromised resources in most of its areas, but most notably in the Emergency Department. <br/><br/>Participants: The participants in the course included the chief nursing officer and managers of various units of the hospital, three of whom supervised units in the Emergency Department. Three faculty members who have specialties in Emergency Nursing from the United States were the visiting nurses mentoring leadership techniques and providing educational classes.<br/> <br/>Methods: In May 2007, a two-day workshop was developed with the needs of the managers in mind. Highlights of the course were: objectives, methods, and evaluation of teaching; critical thinking exercises; organizing lectures; test-question writing; using PowerPoint and Internet resources effectively. <br/><br/>Results: The class was successful and dynamic. The participants were eager to set goals, implement changes, and assess for improved quality nursing care. They were excited to follow-through on unit goals, and felt that improvements were not just a wish, but were indeed within their grasp. <br/><br/>Recommendations: Contact with the participants is continuing throughout this year. The goal is to mentor them in educating their own nurses, and improving leadership capabilities.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:28:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:28:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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