2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162457
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Survey of Emergency Department "Fast Track" Characteristics
Abstract:
A Survey of Emergency Department "Fast Track" Characteristics
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2008
Author:Storer, Andrew, CRNP, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:Thomas Jefferson University, Dept. of Emergency Medicine
Title:Research Nurse Practitioner
Contact Address:1020 Sansom Street, Thompson 239, Philadelphia, PA, 19107-, USA
Co-Authors:Linda Davis-Moon, CRNP, MSN, APRN, BC
Purpose: Fast Tracks (FT) have been created to help expedite care for less serious conditions in Emergency Departments (ED). Little research has been conducted on United States FT statistics. A literature search conducted in June 2007 revealed no studies with FT characteristics. Several emergency medicine and nursing organizations have advocated for the use of FTs to help increase ED throughput and decrease ED overcrowding. This survey attempted to gather data regarding characteristics of several FTs.

Design: A descriptive non-experimental survey of hospitals with FT units was obtained via an e-mail survey.
Setting: Academic medical centers in multiple geographic areas.

Participants: Fourteen academic medical centers who are members of the University Health Consortium participated.

Methods: A survey of seven questions was e-mailed to the participating sites. The survey asked questions regarding unit location, provider type, percentage of patients seen, hours, ancillary services available, and impact on main Emergency Department (ED) flow.

Results: All hospitals surveyed responded. 78.5% (n=11) of the FT units are located directly in the main ED. The FT units surveyed see on average 17% of the daily census with ranges from 10%-27%. A majority of the FTs surveyed (93%) opened between 8am and noon with the mean opening hour of 11:45AM. One FT had varying hours with at least 18 hours of coverage per day. All FTs' were able to provide the same radiology, laboratory, and support services as the main ED. Provider types between FT units varied from associate providers (physician assistants (PA) and nurse practitioners (NP)) to Emergency Medicine attending physicians with many having mixed provider types. 21% (n=3) used physicians as the sole provider, 14% (n=2) used only PAs, 21% (n=3) used only NPs, 29% (n=4) used a combination of PAs and NPs, and 14% (n=2) used a combination of associate providers and physicians. Only one Emergency Department reported a decreasing volume with most having a stable volume (65%, n=9) but decreased lengths of stay, shorter wait times, and better department throughput. No departments used marketing or advertisement to highlight the Fast Track area.

Recommendations: The authors recommend that a national survey of EDs be conducted that gathers a sample size that is more reflective of national characteristics. This sampling would include a heterogeneous mix of EDs. A national survey would gather data that could be used in lobbying for emergency department funding, staffing, and the use of PAs and NPs as primary providers.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Survey of Emergency Department "Fast Track" Characteristicsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162457-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Survey of Emergency Department &quot;Fast Track&quot; Characteristics</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2008</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Storer, Andrew, CRNP, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Thomas Jefferson University, Dept. of Emergency Medicine</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Research Nurse Practitioner</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1020 Sansom Street, Thompson 239, Philadelphia, PA, 19107-, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">astorer@temple.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Linda Davis-Moon, CRNP, MSN, APRN, BC</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Fast Tracks (FT) have been created to help expedite care for less serious conditions in Emergency Departments (ED). Little research has been conducted on United States FT statistics. A literature search conducted in June 2007 revealed no studies with FT characteristics. Several emergency medicine and nursing organizations have advocated for the use of FTs to help increase ED throughput and decrease ED overcrowding. This survey attempted to gather data regarding characteristics of several FTs. <br/><br/>Design: A descriptive non-experimental survey of hospitals with FT units was obtained via an e-mail survey. <br/>Setting: Academic medical centers in multiple geographic areas. <br/><br/>Participants: Fourteen academic medical centers who are members of the University Health Consortium participated. <br/><br/>Methods: A survey of seven questions was e-mailed to the participating sites. The survey asked questions regarding unit location, provider type, percentage of patients seen, hours, ancillary services available, and impact on main Emergency Department (ED) flow.<br/><br/>Results: All hospitals surveyed responded. 78.5% (n=11) of the FT units are located directly in the main ED. The FT units surveyed see on average 17% of the daily census with ranges from 10%-27%. A majority of the FTs surveyed (93%) opened between 8am and noon with the mean opening hour of 11:45AM. One FT had varying hours with at least 18 hours of coverage per day. All FTs' were able to provide the same radiology, laboratory, and support services as the main ED. Provider types between FT units varied from associate providers (physician assistants (PA) and nurse practitioners (NP)) to Emergency Medicine attending physicians with many having mixed provider types. 21% (n=3) used physicians as the sole provider, 14% (n=2) used only PAs, 21% (n=3) used only NPs, 29% (n=4) used a combination of PAs and NPs, and 14% (n=2) used a combination of associate providers and physicians. Only one Emergency Department reported a decreasing volume with most having a stable volume (65%, n=9) but decreased lengths of stay, shorter wait times, and better department throughput. No departments used marketing or advertisement to highlight the Fast Track area.<br/><br/>Recommendations: The authors recommend that a national survey of EDs be conducted that gathers a sample size that is more reflective of national characteristics. This sampling would include a heterogeneous mix of EDs. A national survey would gather data that could be used in lobbying for emergency department funding, staffing, and the use of PAs and NPs as primary providers.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:28:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:28:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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