2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162461
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Leadership in the Absence of a Leader
Abstract:
Leadership in the Absence of a Leader
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2008
Author:Wilson, Mercedes L., RN, BSN, CEN
P.I. Institution Name:Oregon Health & Sciences University
Title:ED Lead/Charge nurse
Contact Address:, Portland, OR, 97239-, USA
Purpose: Recruiting managers for an Emergency Department can be an arduous task. Nationally, 42% of emergency departments are without a manager. It is the third most difficult clinical manager positions to fill. In the absence of a formal leader, the progression of daily clinical operations must continue. Therefore, a Lead Team was established to take on these tasks.

Design: A system development model to supplement the need for day to day leadership in the emergency department was used.

Setting: A 42 bed emergency department, in an academic level 1 trauma center.

Participants: The Lead Team was comprised of four charge nurses, selected by the Nursing Division Director, along with the Nurse Practice Education Coordinator and Director. Omitting the Director, the Lead Team had a minimum of 10 years nursing experience, with a mean of 15 years experience.

Methods: The Lead Team provided consistent charge nurse coverage with minimal relief coverage. Prior to the establishment of the Lead Team, the charge nurse role was a rotating position in the department. Daily operation issues such as shift trades, short staffing and incident reports, a former manager task, was delegated to this group. In addition, attendance at weekly meetings provided increased leadership skill building, assistance with problem-solving and increased information exchange. Capitalizing on each member?s strength, additional responsibility, committees and tasks were divided. Examples include attendance at quality management meeting, interdisciplinary operation work groups, and increase involvement in emergency preparedness. Situations involving disciplinary action, evaluations, and budget approval were referred to the Division Director.

Results: The Lead Team was successful on many levels. Accountability for daily operations increased, as well as accountability among the staff. Consistency and efficiency in resolving problems led to increased staff satisfaction. Representation of the department at unit, hospital, and community events were maintained. It was also identified early on, that additional overtime was need to maintain the program and therefore needed to be factored in to schedules and budget considerations.

Recommendations: Transitioning into and out of new roles is a process. Leadership skills must be built and supported. Having established a higher standard of involvement and participation from the charge nurse role, one significant recommendation was to define a better process for the dissemination of information and new role expectations for relief charge coverage. Although a new manager has been hired, the effectiveness and value of this model has been recognized and continues to be supported, remaining intact.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLeadership in the Absence of a Leaderen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162461-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Leadership in the Absence of a Leader</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2008</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wilson, Mercedes L., RN, BSN, CEN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Oregon Health &amp; Sciences University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">ED Lead/Charge nurse</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, Portland, OR, 97239-, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">wilsonm@ohsu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Recruiting managers for an Emergency Department can be an arduous task. Nationally, 42% of emergency departments are without a manager. It is the third most difficult clinical manager positions to fill. In the absence of a formal leader, the progression of daily clinical operations must continue. Therefore, a Lead Team was established to take on these tasks.<br/><br/>Design: A system development model to supplement the need for day to day leadership in the emergency department was used.<br/><br/>Setting: A 42 bed emergency department, in an academic level 1 trauma center.<br/><br/>Participants: The Lead Team was comprised of four charge nurses, selected by the Nursing Division Director, along with the Nurse Practice Education Coordinator and Director. Omitting the Director, the Lead Team had a minimum of 10 years nursing experience, with a mean of 15 years experience.<br/><br/>Methods: The Lead Team provided consistent charge nurse coverage with minimal relief coverage. Prior to the establishment of the Lead Team, the charge nurse role was a rotating position in the department. Daily operation issues such as shift trades, short staffing and incident reports, a former manager task, was delegated to this group. In addition, attendance at weekly meetings provided increased leadership skill building, assistance with problem-solving and increased information exchange. Capitalizing on each member?s strength, additional responsibility, committees and tasks were divided. Examples include attendance at quality management meeting, interdisciplinary operation work groups, and increase involvement in emergency preparedness. Situations involving disciplinary action, evaluations, and budget approval were referred to the Division Director.<br/><br/>Results: The Lead Team was successful on many levels. Accountability for daily operations increased, as well as accountability among the staff. Consistency and efficiency in resolving problems led to increased staff satisfaction. Representation of the department at unit, hospital, and community events were maintained. It was also identified early on, that additional overtime was need to maintain the program and therefore needed to be factored in to schedules and budget considerations.<br/><br/>Recommendations: Transitioning into and out of new roles is a process. Leadership skills must be built and supported. Having established a higher standard of involvement and participation from the charge nurse role, one significant recommendation was to define a better process for the dissemination of information and new role expectations for relief charge coverage. Although a new manager has been hired, the effectiveness and value of this model has been recognized and continues to be supported, remaining intact.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:28:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:28:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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