"Call Ahead Seating and Then Seat Yourself"- New ED Technology Helps Get Patients from Rescue Arrival to Rooms Quickly

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162484
Type:
Presentation
Title:
"Call Ahead Seating and Then Seat Yourself"- New ED Technology Helps Get Patients from Rescue Arrival to Rooms Quickly
Abstract:
"Call Ahead Seating and Then Seat Yourself"- New ED Technology Helps Get Patients from Rescue Arrival to Rooms Quickly
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2008
Author:Robin, Nancy M., RN, M.Ed., CEN
P.I. Institution Name:Miriam Hospital
Title:Emergency Department Professional Practice Development Specialist
Contact Address:164 Summit Avenue, Providence, RI, 02906, USA
Contact Telephone:401-793-3339
[Clinical Poster] Clinical Topic: Our 44,000 annual visit emergency department has an ambulance and walk-in entrance. Our ED wanted to use the new computerized bed-tracking technology to direct rescues to the bed assignments. Our dilemma was that rescues would arrive and wait to be directed by the charge/triage nurse to a bed assignment. With the charge nurse being extremely busy, rescues would be lining up in the hallway, sometime 3 to 5 deep. The process of waiting for a nurse to direct rescues to beds needed to be addressed.

Implementation: Our ED wanted to improve the time from rescue arrival to bed placement. We looked at our bed tracking system to see if it could help solve the problem. With some modifications, our tracking system could be adapted to accommodate our needs. The charge nurse would place the name of the rescue "ABC Rescue" in the bed assignment. It would then show up on the locator screen. Nurses could visualize that a new rescue patient would be arriving with the ETA. The biggest challenge was placing a computer with a locator screen in the ambulance entrance and verifying that it was HIPAA compliant. This view only screen provided the information so rescues could go directly to the room assigned. The rescue would look for their rescue name and directly proceed to the bed. All area rescues were notified of the process change.

Outcomes: The rescues and ED staff loved the new process. Rescues could immediately transport their patient to a room assignment. By assigned beds after receiving the rescue call, the charge nurse had more time to consider bed availability, nursing skill sets, acuity of patient assignments prior to bed placement. There was an improved relationship with rescues. A nurse immediately met rescues in the room. Rescue turn around time improved. Once the patient was accepted into the room, the nurse would change the name from "ABC Rescue" to the patient name and answer "Yes", the patient has arrived. This started the clock that the patient has been admitted into the Emergency Department.

Recommendations: Look to see if your bed-tracking system has the capability to enter rescue names into the system. See if it is feasible to place a locator screen at your ambulance entrance. By placing a computer screen at the ambulance entrance, you will be able to stop the backup of rescues waiting for bed placement.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.title"Call Ahead Seating and Then Seat Yourself"- New ED Technology Helps Get Patients from Rescue Arrival to Rooms Quicklyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162484-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">&quot;Call Ahead Seating and Then Seat Yourself&quot;- New ED Technology Helps Get Patients from Rescue Arrival to Rooms Quickly</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2008</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Robin, Nancy M., RN, M.Ed., CEN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Miriam Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Emergency Department Professional Practice Development Specialist</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">164 Summit Avenue, Providence, RI, 02906, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">401-793-3339</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">nrobin@lifespan.org</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Clinical Poster] Clinical Topic: Our 44,000 annual visit emergency department has an ambulance and walk-in entrance. Our ED wanted to use the new computerized bed-tracking technology to direct rescues to the bed assignments. Our dilemma was that rescues would arrive and wait to be directed by the charge/triage nurse to a bed assignment. With the charge nurse being extremely busy, rescues would be lining up in the hallway, sometime 3 to 5 deep. The process of waiting for a nurse to direct rescues to beds needed to be addressed. <br/><br/>Implementation: Our ED wanted to improve the time from rescue arrival to bed placement. We looked at our bed tracking system to see if it could help solve the problem. With some modifications, our tracking system could be adapted to accommodate our needs. The charge nurse would place the name of the rescue &quot;ABC Rescue&quot; in the bed assignment. It would then show up on the locator screen. Nurses could visualize that a new rescue patient would be arriving with the ETA. The biggest challenge was placing a computer with a locator screen in the ambulance entrance and verifying that it was HIPAA compliant. This view only screen provided the information so rescues could go directly to the room assigned. The rescue would look for their rescue name and directly proceed to the bed. All area rescues were notified of the process change. <br/><br/>Outcomes: The rescues and ED staff loved the new process. Rescues could immediately transport their patient to a room assignment. By assigned beds after receiving the rescue call, the charge nurse had more time to consider bed availability, nursing skill sets, acuity of patient assignments prior to bed placement. There was an improved relationship with rescues. A nurse immediately met rescues in the room. Rescue turn around time improved. Once the patient was accepted into the room, the nurse would change the name from &quot;ABC Rescue&quot; to the patient name and answer &quot;Yes&quot;, the patient has arrived. This started the clock that the patient has been admitted into the Emergency Department.<br/><br/>Recommendations: Look to see if your bed-tracking system has the capability to enter rescue names into the system. See if it is feasible to place a locator screen at your ambulance entrance. By placing a computer screen at the ambulance entrance, you will be able to stop the backup of rescues waiting for bed placement.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:28:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:28:59Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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