2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162485
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Link Between Ski Helmet Wear and Risk Taking
Abstract:
The Link Between Ski Helmet Wear and Risk Taking
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2008
Author:Robinson, Marylou V., PhD, FNP, CCRN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Colorado Denver School of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:13120 East 19th Ave. - Room 4117, P.O. Box 6511, Aurora, CO, 80045, USA
Contact Telephone:(303) 724-8564
[Research Presentation] Purpose: To explore whether risk taking tendencies are linked to the adoption or rejection of snow-sport helmets in youthful, recreational level, skiers and snowboarders. Given that 14% of all snowsport injuries are head injuries (22% in children) and significant neurological protection with helmet has been established, the 20% of slope-side wear rates are of concern. Risk taking activities contribute to injury rate. Research gaps exist between measuring risk propensity and attitudes toward adoption of helmets.

Design: This mixed methods study examined quantitative risk propensity scores and qualitative data from focus groups.

Setting: The study was conducted in the Pacific Northwest.

Sample: A convenience sample of 50 recreational level skiers and snowboarders (n = 26) age 15-28 (M = 20.3). Gender reflected local sport populations with 70% male participants.

Methodology: Completion of the Rohrmann's Risk Orientation Questionnaire and Zuckerman's Sensation Seeking Scale V (SSS) was followed by hour long focus group discussions of perceived risk taking in snow sports and helmet wear. Independent inferences were drawn within quantitative and qualitative frameworks, then triangulated for greater insights.

Results: Both genders out-scored norms on risk scales yet did not perceive self or sport to be risky. As anticipated, males scored higher than females (p = .00) on sensation seeking, but not on risk propensity. Neither genders' scores diminished with age. SSS (p = .04) and Boredom Susceptibility subscale scores (p < .01) were higher for boarders, otherwise, equipment was not linked with scores or helmet use. Barriers to helmet wear included fashion issues, cost, and lack of perceived necessity. Adoption factors mentioned were slope difficulty, witnessing another's injury, extended experience and parental wear. The highest scores were linked with comments about using helmets temporarily to facilitate learning complex tricks. Prior head injury was linked higher experience seeking and excitement scores and less helmet wear.

Conclusions: Recognizing that the highest risk-takers intermittently adopt helmets to facilitate risky behavior generates concern. Helmet campaigns should a) address the perceived lack of risk in the sport; b) focus upon the fact that those with prior head injuries do not wear helmets, and c) capitalize on the finding that parental wear strongly influences adolescent helmet adoption patterns. EMAIL: marylou.robinson@uchsc.edu
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Link Between Ski Helmet Wear and Risk Takingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162485-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Link Between Ski Helmet Wear and Risk Taking</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2008</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Robinson, Marylou V., PhD, FNP, CCRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Colorado Denver School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">13120 East 19th Ave. - Room 4117, P.O. Box 6511, Aurora, CO, 80045, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(303) 724-8564</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Marylou.robinson@uchsc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] Purpose: To explore whether risk taking tendencies are linked to the adoption or rejection of snow-sport helmets in youthful, recreational level, skiers and snowboarders. Given that 14% of all snowsport injuries are head injuries (22% in children) and significant neurological protection with helmet has been established, the 20% of slope-side wear rates are of concern. Risk taking activities contribute to injury rate. Research gaps exist between measuring risk propensity and attitudes toward adoption of helmets. <br/><br/>Design: This mixed methods study examined quantitative risk propensity scores and qualitative data from focus groups.<br/><br/>Setting: The study was conducted in the Pacific Northwest.<br/><br/>Sample: A convenience sample of 50 recreational level skiers and snowboarders (n = 26) age 15-28 (M = 20.3). Gender reflected local sport populations with 70% male participants.<br/><br/>Methodology: Completion of the Rohrmann's Risk Orientation Questionnaire and Zuckerman's Sensation Seeking Scale V (SSS) was followed by hour long focus group discussions of perceived risk taking in snow sports and helmet wear. Independent inferences were drawn within quantitative and qualitative frameworks, then triangulated for greater insights. <br/><br/>Results: Both genders out-scored norms on risk scales yet did not perceive self or sport to be risky. As anticipated, males scored higher than females (p = .00) on sensation seeking, but not on risk propensity. Neither genders' scores diminished with age. SSS (p = .04) and Boredom Susceptibility subscale scores (p &lt; .01) were higher for boarders, otherwise, equipment was not linked with scores or helmet use. Barriers to helmet wear included fashion issues, cost, and lack of perceived necessity. Adoption factors mentioned were slope difficulty, witnessing another's injury, extended experience and parental wear. The highest scores were linked with comments about using helmets temporarily to facilitate learning complex tricks. Prior head injury was linked higher experience seeking and excitement scores and less helmet wear. <br/><br/>Conclusions: Recognizing that the highest risk-takers intermittently adopt helmets to facilitate risky behavior generates concern. Helmet campaigns should a) address the perceived lack of risk in the sport; b) focus upon the fact that those with prior head injuries do not wear helmets, and c) capitalize on the finding that parental wear strongly influences adolescent helmet adoption patterns. EMAIL: marylou.robinson@uchsc.edu</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:29:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:29:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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