2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162502
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Teach A Man To Fish...Feed Him For A Lifetime
Abstract:
Teach A Man To Fish...Feed Him For A Lifetime
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2009
Author:Thorpe, Sheryl, RN,BSN,CEN
P.I. Institution Name:Sinai Hospital
Title:Clinical Leader
Contact Address:2401 West Belvedere Avenue, Baltimore, MD, 21215
Contact Telephone:410-601-4480
Co-Authors:Diane Bongiovanni, MA, RN, NEA-BC
[Leadership Conference Poster Presentation] Purpose: Continuing education is critical in today's environment. Rapidly changing technology and public report cards have forced institutions to show accountability. With the economy dictating tight budgets for both hospital and staff, and inaccessibility of courses, many staff would be unable to meet an education plan. The challenge nurse leaders' face is how to enable staff to obtain the required education.

Design: In 2005, the ED leadership developed a staff education plan. To enable staff to complete the required courses, a staff development process was utilized. Outcomes were measured after a three-year period.

Setting: The setting is a urban Level II Trauma Center in the Northeast.

Participants/Subjects: The initial participants were ED leadership, the clinical educator, and a select group of experienced ED nurses. As the process continued, the entire ED nursing staff participated.

Methods: In 2005, the leaders of an ED developed an education plan that would adequately prepare the nurses to provide excellent patient care. Funding for the education plan demanded innovative thinking. To obtain initial funding, leadership turned to the hospitals grant writers. They discovered the mayor's office had educational development grants available. Upon successful application for the grant, leadership sent a select group from the experienced nurses in the ED to a TNCC course. Four of the highest performing nurses were then selected to become instructors. Developing instructors allowed the ED to sponsor courses onsite. The fees paid by outside participants allowed inclusion of the rest of the ED staff in these courses for minimal cost. The accessibility of on site courses made it achievable for staff to attend.

Results: Over the next three years, the ED continued developing its staff into instructors. From 2005 to 2008, the ED increased from 0 instructors to six staff verified as TNCC instructors, three staff verified as ENPC instructors, and one staff verified as a CATN instructor. The education level of the staff grew proportionately. In 2005, 2 staff were verified in TNCC, 13 in ENPC and 0 in CATN. By June 2008, 71 nurses were verified in TNCC, 22 in ENPC, and 5 in CATN. The leadership's innovative solution created a win-win solution. The educational level of the staff more than tripled over three years with minimal cost to the ED. Eliminating the barriers of cost and accessibility enabled staff to successfully complete the education plan. In addition, the other registered nurses of the state obtained access to education that previously required out of state travel and was of limited availability.

Recommendations: To provide quality patient care, staff education is necessary. To overcome the reality of limited funds, nurse leaders must be innovative and goal directed. The process used by these leaders is analogous to the well-known parable, "...If you teach a man to fish, you feed him for a lifetime." By developing their nurses, they made them fisherman for the ED and the surrounding community.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTeach A Man To Fish...Feed Him For A Lifetimeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162502-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Teach A Man To Fish...Feed Him For A Lifetime</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Thorpe, Sheryl, RN,BSN,CEN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Sinai Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Leader</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2401 West Belvedere Avenue, Baltimore, MD, 21215</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">410-601-4480</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">scapozzi@lifebridgehealth.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Diane Bongiovanni, MA, RN, NEA-BC</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Leadership Conference Poster Presentation] Purpose: Continuing education is critical in today's environment. Rapidly changing technology and public report cards have forced institutions to show accountability. With the economy dictating tight budgets for both hospital and staff, and inaccessibility of courses, many staff would be unable to meet an education plan. The challenge nurse leaders' face is how to enable staff to obtain the required education. <br/> <br/>Design: In 2005, the ED leadership developed a staff education plan. To enable staff to complete the required courses, a staff development process was utilized. Outcomes were measured after a three-year period.<br/><br/> Setting: The setting is a urban Level II Trauma Center in the Northeast.<br/><br/>Participants/Subjects: The initial participants were ED leadership, the clinical educator, and a select group of experienced ED nurses. As the process continued, the entire ED nursing staff participated.<br/><br/>Methods: In 2005, the leaders of an ED developed an education plan that would adequately prepare the nurses to provide excellent patient care. Funding for the education plan demanded innovative thinking. To obtain initial funding, leadership turned to the hospitals grant writers. They discovered the mayor's office had educational development grants available. Upon successful application for the grant, leadership sent a select group from the experienced nurses in the ED to a TNCC course. Four of the highest performing nurses were then selected to become instructors. Developing instructors allowed the ED to sponsor courses onsite. The fees paid by outside participants allowed inclusion of the rest of the ED staff in these courses for minimal cost. The accessibility of on site courses made it achievable for staff to attend. <br/><br/>Results: Over the next three years, the ED continued developing its staff into instructors. From 2005 to 2008, the ED increased from 0 instructors to six staff verified as TNCC instructors, three staff verified as ENPC instructors, and one staff verified as a CATN instructor. The education level of the staff grew proportionately. In 2005, 2 staff were verified in TNCC, 13 in ENPC and 0 in CATN. By June 2008, 71 nurses were verified in TNCC, 22 in ENPC, and 5 in CATN. The leadership's innovative solution created a win-win solution. The educational level of the staff more than tripled over three years with minimal cost to the ED. Eliminating the barriers of cost and accessibility enabled staff to successfully complete the education plan. In addition, the other registered nurses of the state obtained access to education that previously required out of state travel and was of limited availability.<br/> <br/>Recommendations: To provide quality patient care, staff education is necessary. To overcome the reality of limited funds, nurse leaders must be innovative and goal directed. The process used by these leaders is analogous to the well-known parable, &quot;...If you teach a man to fish, you feed him for a lifetime.&quot; By developing their nurses, they made them fisherman for the ED and the surrounding community.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:29:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:29:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.