2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162503
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Enhancing an Emergency Department Residency Program Through Simulation
Abstract:
Enhancing an Emergency Department Residency Program Through Simulation
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2009
Author:White, Barbara, RN, BSN, CCRN, CEN
P.I. Institution Name:Washington Hospital Center
Title:Clinical Manager/Educator
Contact Address:110 Irving Street NW, Washington, DC, 20010
Contact Telephone:202-877-5095
Co-Authors:Karen Elliott, RN, BSN, MS
[Leadership Conference Poster Presentation] Purpose: The fact that the United States is in the midst of a growing nursing shortage is well known. A consequence of the nursing shortage is the scarcity of experienced nurses available to work in acute specialty areas, such as critical care and the emergency department. New graduate nurses are entering these areas with limited practical clinical experience (Beyea, Von Reyn, & Slattery, 2007). Compounding the problem, employers no longer have the luxury of offering costly and lengthy orientations to compensate for the lack of clinical experience. New graduate nurses must transition into fully functioning nurses extremely quickly (Jefferies, 2007).
Emergency department patients necessitate that the nurse be able to perform high-level critical thinking and intricate technical skills. These skills allow the nurse to be able to shift priorities quickly, adjust to rapid patient turnover, and perform accurate assessments (Wolf, 2005). Traditional orientation methods may not be sufficient to provide these skills. Incorporating high fidelity patient simulation into an established residency program is one possible solution.

Design: An established RN residency program incorporated high fidelity patient simulation to enhance staff development.

Setting: This management project was developed to enhance the orientation of new graduate and bridge nurses into a large, mid-Atlantic, urban emergency department with an annual patient census of 68,000. The RN vacancy rate at the start of FY2007 was 60%. The department oriented 24 new graduate or bridge nurses during FY 2007.

Participants/Subjects: New graduate and bridge nurses actively used high fidelity patient simulation during their orientation. Bridge nurses are nurses who have previous experience in other specialties, but are new to emergency nursing.

Methods: The new graduate and bridge nurses attending the nursing residency program participated in a three-hour ED specific focused assessment and documentation simulation using Laredal's high fidelity simulator "SimMan." The nurses divided into two groups and performed their assessment on two similar "patients". Both "patients" were elderly and complained of dyspnea, but had different diagnoses. The nurses documented their initial focused assessment and wrote their initial nursing note for each patient.
"SimMan" was used for technical skill development in airway, pacemaker, and chest tube management; ICP and CVP monitoring; and defibrillation/cardioversion. Orientation included extensive code blue training. "Noelle" and "SimBaby" were used in precipitous delivery and pediatric emergency scenarios.

Results: Feedback from the nurses who participated in the simulated learning experience stated the simulation was very helpful in preparing them to write ED specific nursing notes and perform correct assessment skills. They stated that the simulation scenarios connected the theory to actual practice (EROne, 2007). Of the nurses who completed the program, 93% are still employed in the emergency department. At the end of FY2007, the RN vacancy rate had decreased to 40%.
Recommendations: Incorporating high fidelity patient simulations into new graduate and bridge residency programs allow the nurses to develop critical thinking and technical skills in a safe environment. Simulation is a learning strategy that can be used to increase the confidence of new nurses in the ED.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEnhancing an Emergency Department Residency Program Through Simulationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162503-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Enhancing an Emergency Department Residency Program Through Simulation</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">White, Barbara, RN, BSN, CCRN, CEN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Washington Hospital Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Manager/Educator</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">110 Irving Street NW, Washington, DC, 20010</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">202-877-5095</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Barbara.white@medstar.net</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Karen Elliott, RN, BSN, MS</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Leadership Conference Poster Presentation] Purpose: The fact that the United States is in the midst of a growing nursing shortage is well known. A consequence of the nursing shortage is the scarcity of experienced nurses available to work in acute specialty areas, such as critical care and the emergency department. New graduate nurses are entering these areas with limited practical clinical experience (Beyea, Von Reyn, &amp; Slattery, 2007). Compounding the problem, employers no longer have the luxury of offering costly and lengthy orientations to compensate for the lack of clinical experience. New graduate nurses must transition into fully functioning nurses extremely quickly (Jefferies, 2007). <br/>Emergency department patients necessitate that the nurse be able to perform high-level critical thinking and intricate technical skills. These skills allow the nurse to be able to shift priorities quickly, adjust to rapid patient turnover, and perform accurate assessments (Wolf, 2005). Traditional orientation methods may not be sufficient to provide these skills. Incorporating high fidelity patient simulation into an established residency program is one possible solution. <br/><br/>Design: An established RN residency program incorporated high fidelity patient simulation to enhance staff development. <br/><br/>Setting: This management project was developed to enhance the orientation of new graduate and bridge nurses into a large, mid-Atlantic, urban emergency department with an annual patient census of 68,000. The RN vacancy rate at the start of FY2007 was 60%. The department oriented 24 new graduate or bridge nurses during FY 2007. <br/><br/>Participants/Subjects: New graduate and bridge nurses actively used high fidelity patient simulation during their orientation. Bridge nurses are nurses who have previous experience in other specialties, but are new to emergency nursing.<br/><br/>Methods: The new graduate and bridge nurses attending the nursing residency program participated in a three-hour ED specific focused assessment and documentation simulation using Laredal's high fidelity simulator &quot;SimMan.&quot; The nurses divided into two groups and performed their assessment on two similar &quot;patients&quot;. Both &quot;patients&quot; were elderly and complained of dyspnea, but had different diagnoses. The nurses documented their initial focused assessment and wrote their initial nursing note for each patient. <br/>&quot;SimMan&quot; was used for technical skill development in airway, pacemaker, and chest tube management; ICP and CVP monitoring; and defibrillation/cardioversion. Orientation included extensive code blue training. &quot;Noelle&quot; and &quot;SimBaby&quot; were used in precipitous delivery and pediatric emergency scenarios. <br/><br/>Results: Feedback from the nurses who participated in the simulated learning experience stated the simulation was very helpful in preparing them to write ED specific nursing notes and perform correct assessment skills. They stated that the simulation scenarios connected the theory to actual practice (EROne, 2007). Of the nurses who completed the program, 93% are still employed in the emergency department. At the end of FY2007, the RN vacancy rate had decreased to 40%. <br/>Recommendations: Incorporating high fidelity patient simulations into new graduate and bridge residency programs allow the nurses to develop critical thinking and technical skills in a safe environment. Simulation is a learning strategy that can be used to increase the confidence of new nurses in the ED.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:29:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:29:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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