2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162515
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Utilizing a Human Patient Simulator to Facilitate New Graduate Orientation
Abstract:
Utilizing a Human Patient Simulator to Facilitate New Graduate Orientation
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2009
Author:Burnie, Jeannie, RN, BSN, CEN
P.I. Institution Name:Bethesda North Hospital
Title:Emergency Department Staff Educator
Contact Address:10500 Montgomery Road, Cincinnati, OH, 45242, USA
Contact Telephone:513-745-1496
Co-Authors:Joshua Ingham, RN, BSN, EMT-P; Randall Johann, BS, EMT-P
[Annual Conference] Clinical Topic: There was a decrease in the number of nurses with clinical experience that applied for positions in the Emergency Department (E.D.) at one suburban Midwestern hospital. Because of this, a decision was made by the E. D. nursing leadership team to hire newly graduated registered nurses directly into the E.D. Three new graduates were hired into the department in July of 2008. In order to enhance their orientation program, it was decided that they would enter an internship program that would be five to six months in length. As part of that internship program, simulation through the use of a Human Patient Simulator was utilized.
Implementation: During the interview process, expectations were discussed regarding successful completion of the internship program. The interns were assigned to primary clinical preceptors, but were also expected to work closely with the ED Educator and Training and Simulation Center staff. Another expectation was completion of the Emergency Nursing Association on-line orientation program. In addition, each intern was provided with "Sheehy's Manual of Emergency Nursing" to facilitate their learning experiences.
The program consisted of a scheduled monthly three hour lectures followed by a three hour coordinated simulation experience. This consisted of integrating the didactic and clinical content into the simulation arena. The didactic and simulation components covered six different content areas. During each simulation session, the following assessment criteria were covered: 1) patient assessment, 2) interviewing skills, 3) diagnostic tools, 4) equipment, 5) medication usage, 6) documentation.
Outcomes: Evaluation of the simulation by the interns took place by both debriefing sessions immediately after the simulation experience and formal evaluations using a Likert scale. The interns initially reported feelings of inadequacy in the simulation but agreed that it would enhance clinical skills. On the final simulation experience the interns stated that they looked forward to their time in the lab. They verbalized that it was a time of learning without fear of harm. The formal evaluations from each session were rated 4.9 on the Likert scale.
Use of the patient simulator in the internship program allowed them to practice skills that they may not have been exposed to in their clinical orientation. They were successfully prepared for their role as staff nurses in the ED.
Recommendations: Patient simulation is an important adjunct in teaching and evaluating nurses critical thinking skills. By using a variety of educational tools the orientation process can be enhanced to ensure success with new graduate nurses in an internship program the E.R. The use of high-fidelity patient simulators can be a valuable resource allowing hands-on care, and discussion regarding the risks and benefits of a variety of treatment modalities. Research needs to continue in this area to validate the benefits of integrating the use of simulation into internship programs. Each program must be tailored to meet the needs of the individual department.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUtilizing a Human Patient Simulator to Facilitate New Graduate Orientationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162515-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Utilizing a Human Patient Simulator to Facilitate New Graduate Orientation</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Burnie, Jeannie, RN, BSN, CEN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Bethesda North Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Emergency Department Staff Educator</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">10500 Montgomery Road, Cincinnati, OH, 45242, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">513-745-1496</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Jeannie_burnie@trihealth.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Joshua Ingham, RN, BSN, EMT-P; Randall Johann, BS, EMT-P</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Annual Conference] Clinical Topic: There was a decrease in the number of nurses with clinical experience that applied for positions in the Emergency Department (E.D.) at one suburban Midwestern hospital. Because of this, a decision was made by the E. D. nursing leadership team to hire newly graduated registered nurses directly into the E.D. Three new graduates were hired into the department in July of 2008. In order to enhance their orientation program, it was decided that they would enter an internship program that would be five to six months in length. As part of that internship program, simulation through the use of a Human Patient Simulator was utilized. <br/>Implementation: During the interview process, expectations were discussed regarding successful completion of the internship program. The interns were assigned to primary clinical preceptors, but were also expected to work closely with the ED Educator and Training and Simulation Center staff. Another expectation was completion of the Emergency Nursing Association on-line orientation program. In addition, each intern was provided with &quot;Sheehy's Manual of Emergency Nursing&quot; to facilitate their learning experiences.<br/>The program consisted of a scheduled monthly three hour lectures followed by a three hour coordinated simulation experience. This consisted of integrating the didactic and clinical content into the simulation arena. The didactic and simulation components covered six different content areas. During each simulation session, the following assessment criteria were covered: 1) patient assessment, 2) interviewing skills, 3) diagnostic tools, 4) equipment, 5) medication usage, 6) documentation. <br/>Outcomes: Evaluation of the simulation by the interns took place by both debriefing sessions immediately after the simulation experience and formal evaluations using a Likert scale. The interns initially reported feelings of inadequacy in the simulation but agreed that it would enhance clinical skills. On the final simulation experience the interns stated that they looked forward to their time in the lab. They verbalized that it was a time of learning without fear of harm. The formal evaluations from each session were rated 4.9 on the Likert scale. <br/>Use of the patient simulator in the internship program allowed them to practice skills that they may not have been exposed to in their clinical orientation. They were successfully prepared for their role as staff nurses in the ED.<br/>Recommendations: Patient simulation is an important adjunct in teaching and evaluating nurses critical thinking skills. By using a variety of educational tools the orientation process can be enhanced to ensure success with new graduate nurses in an internship program the E.R. The use of high-fidelity patient simulators can be a valuable resource allowing hands-on care, and discussion regarding the risks and benefits of a variety of treatment modalities. Research needs to continue in this area to validate the benefits of integrating the use of simulation into internship programs. Each program must be tailored to meet the needs of the individual department. <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:29:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:29:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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